Courses | Physical Science, B.S.

Summary

Below are some of the courses you’ll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising. For official program requirements see catalog for details.

Integration Seminar

Senior level capstone seminar in which the student will search the Bible and the literature dealing with the topic(s) under discussion in the course leading to the discovery of means whereby the subject area may be "integrated" with Biblical truth. The results of the research will be incorporated in a paper or project which will be critiqued by the seminar members and by the professor.

Major Courses

Principles and theories of the structure and properties of matter including stoichiometry, atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical bonding, molecular structure, nomenclature, chemical reactions, states of matter, gas laws and solutions.

Continuation of General Chemistry I. Subjects include chemical kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, solubility, acidity, electrochemistry, coordination complexes and various special topics.

Limits, differentiation and integration of rational and trigonometric functions, with applications.

Differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential and inverse trigonometric functions; various methods of integration; infinite sequences and series; parametric equations, polar coordinates.

This course is intended for Chemistry, Physics and Engineering Department majors or anyone else interested in learning to develop their intuition for problem-solving using formal and informal techniques. Involves the use of MATLAB, Excel and other computer tools for data analysis.

Basic principles of physics emphasizing Newtonian mechanics; conservation of energy and momentum; oscillations, fluids and thermodynamics.

The application of the laws and theories of mechanics and thermodynamics through experiment.

Introduction to electrostatics, conductors and currents, magnetic fields, and Maxwell's equations.

Wave theory, sound, geometric optics, interference and diffraction, relativity, wave properties of particles, and introduction to quantum physics.

The application of the laws and theories of electricity and magnetism through experiment.

A capstone course for all biochemistry, chemistry, physics, and physical science majors that includes: (1) presentation of a seminar, (2) service learning project and, (3) integration readings and discussion.

Elective Courses

An interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment using concepts from ecology, biology, chemistry, geology, the social sciences and Scripture to understand the interplay of natural resources, how humans are affecting the environment, and how to deal with environmental problems.

The first semester of the traditional yearlong course in organic chemistry. Structure, properties and reactivity of carbon-containing compounds with emphasis on reaction mechanisms. An introduction to the major functional groups and the instrumental methods for structure determination: IR, NMR, and MS.

Continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Continued work with more complicated reactions and mechanisms. An introduction to computer-based drawing and searching tools. The last third of the course is devoted to the structure and properties of major biochemical substances.

Basic laboratory techniques for the synthesis, isolation, purification and analysis of organic compounds including the major chromatographic methods, TLC, GC, LC.

Continuation of the laboratory methods in organic chemistry including the major structural determination and analysis tools of NMR, IR, HPLC, UV/Vis.

The structure, properties and reactivity of organic and biological molecules.

Functions of two and three variables, partial differentiation, multiple integration, curves and surfaces in three dimensional space.

Topics from matrices, determinants, linear transformations and vector spaces.

First order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, power series solutions, Laplace transforms, systems of first order linear equations.

An introduction to earth science including: processes that shape the earth's surface, oceans and atmosphere; plate tectonics, earth history and the fossil record, natural resources and environmental concerns.

A conceptual astronomy course, designed to acquaint the student with the current state of knowledge of the solar system, the Milky Way, galaxies, quasars and cosmology.

Use of computation tools using MATLAB and LabVIEW in chemistry, physics and engineering, digital signal analysis and instrument control.

Statics of particles, rigid bodies in two and three dimensions, centroids and centers of gravity, structures, friction, and inertia.

Introduction to circuit elements, network theorems, response, semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, and the operation and design of analog DC/AC circuits. Also introduces the fundamentals of Boolean logic and digital design. Laboratory work involves extensive construction and analysis of circuits, as well as introduction of soldering and assembly techniques.


Concentrations

Secondary Instruction

General Education Course:

A survey of psychology as an empirical/behavioral science with a consideration of underlying philosophical bases in light of a Christian worldview. Topics to be surveyed include development, cognition, learning, motivation, physiology, socialization, personality and psychopathology.

Core Courses:

This course examines the structure and function of the school, foundations of education, qualities required for teacher effectiveness, and contemporary issues in education. A 25-hour fieldwork practicum component is required. Successful completion of this course constitutes one of the requirements for admission to the Teacher Preparation Program. CBEST must be taken during this course.

Application of psychological principles to the education process, role of the teacher and learner, human growth and development, learning styles, motivation, memory, transfer of learning, measurement and evaluation, research and experimentation in learning theory.

Survey of the theories, programs, and instructional practices for English language development, including first and second language acquisition and individual factors affecting language acquisition. Strategies for the application of theory to classroom practice and instruction in content area literacy are emphasized. Principles of educational equity, diversity, and cultural and linguistic responsiveness are examined.

Methods and materials for teaching reading through content areas in secondary schools; attention to reading techniques, testing, and individualization.

During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, Single Subject candidates relate the Common Core and the state-adopted K-12 academic content standards for candidates in their specific subject area to major concepts and principles in their discipline, including planning, organizing, and implementing effective instruction (Grades 7-12).

Single Subject Pedagogy - Art: 
During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, Single Subject Art candidates learn, understand and use content-specific teaching strategies for achieving the fundamental goals of the state-adopted K-12 academic content standards for students in Art (Grades 7-12).

Single Subject Pedagogy - English: During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, Single Subject English candidates learn, understand and use content-specific teaching strategies for achieving the fundamental goals of the state-adopted K-12 academic content standards for students in English (Grades 7-12).

Single Subject Pedagogy - Methods of Teaching Spanish as a Foreign Language: During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, Single Subject Modern Language candidates learn, understand, and use specific teaching strategies and activities for achieving the fundamental goals of the state-adopted K-12 Foreign Language Framework and Student Academic Content Standards for students learning Spanish (Grades 7-12).

Single Subject Pedagogy - Health Science: 
During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, Single Subject Health Science candidates learn, understand and use content-specific teaching strategies for achieving the fundamental goals of the state-adopted K-12 academic content standards for students in Health Science (Grades 7-12).

Single Subject Pedagogy - History/Social Science: During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, Single Subject History/Social Science candidates learn, understand and use content-specific teaching strategies for achieving the fundamental goals of the K-12 state-adopted academic content standards for History/Social Science (Grades 7-12).

Single Subject Pedagogy - Mathematics: During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, Single Subject Mathematics candidates acquire a deep understanding of the interrelated components of a balanced program of mathematics instruction: computational and procedural skills; conceptual understanding of mathematics; and problem solving skills in mathematics, and acquire pedagogical skills that assist students in learning K-12 state-adopted academic content standards for Mathematics (Grades 7-12).

Single Subject Pedagogy - Physical Education: During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, Single Subject Physical Education candidates learn, understand and use content-specific teaching strategies for helping students in learning K-12 state-adopted academic content standards for Physical Education (Grades 7-12).

Single Subject Pedagogy - Science: During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, Single Subject Science candidates relate the state-adopted K-12 academic content standards for students in Science (Grades 7-12) to major concepts, principles and investigations in the science disciplines, including planning, organizing, and implementing effective instruction.

 

Secondary school curriculum, assessment, classroom management and teaching methods as they apply to the content areas in secondary school settings.

A 60-hour fieldwork requirement to support the practical application of LEDU 436 Secondary Curriculum content. Candidates will design and teach several classroom lessons in local secondary schools.

Full-time laboratory experience in school classrooms under the direction of qualified supervising master teachers and University supervisors. University seminar required.

See LEDU 450.

General Physical Science