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SCORR Conference 2021

Cost and Admission

This is a paid event.

$350.00Group Rate
For groups of 10 or more
$40.00Individual Rate
$0.00Biola Students, Faculty, Staff and Alumni

Heritage: Celebrating our Past, Embracing Our Future.

In Isaiah 46:9-10 the prophet declares, “remember the former things of old . . . declaring the end from the beginning and from ancient times things not yet done, saying, ‘My purpose shall stand, and I will fulfill my intention.’” In this verse, the prophet Isaiah urges us to remember the “former things of old,” as well as “things not yet done.” Regardless of the season — past, present, or future — the Lord’s purpose will prevail.

Preceding us is a multitude of people from all walks of life, laboring in the ministry of racial justice and reconciliation, leaving us a legacy to follow. As a result, we look to the future with hope, trusting that a new generation will emerge to engage the world and the church, continuing to build bridges across social divides that result in the expanding of God’s kingdom on earth.

This upcoming conference in February of 2021 marks the 25th anniversary of SCORR, the Student Congress on Racial Reconciliation, hence our theme for this year, Heritage: Celebrating our Past, Embracing Our Future. As we stand at the threshold of this most challenging season, our trust is in the Lord, “looking to Jesus who is the founder and perfecter of our faith” (Hebrews 12:2). Biblically rooted and bold in addressing contemporary issues and challenges, SCORR seeks to be an incubator and catalyst to equip a new generation of leaders and educators to promote the values of inclusion and equity into the fabric of the institutions they will serve.

Due to the pandemic, SCORR will be held remotely this year. Let us continue to stand together as we face the many challenges of our current time. May we continue to fix our gaze on our Lord, remembering the great things God has done and will continue to do.


Questions?

Contact:
scorr@biola.edu


Mission

The mission of SCORR is to empower attendees to become catalysts for change through transformational learning and growth as they engage the diversity of the Kingdom of God.

Vision

The vision of SCORR is to be an annual gathering where attendees experience:

  • instruction that broadens their perspectives,
  • dialogue that enhances critical thinking, and
  • artistic expression that inspires creativity. 

Through active participation in SCORR, attendees will develop a greater vision for enhancing diversity promoting biblical justice and inspiring leadership that results in a life-long process of building God’s Kingdom on earth.

Goals

  • To provide teaching on the biblical basis on reconciliation, justice, and the Kingdom of God on earth.
  • To address issues facing contemporary society and engage one another in critical dialogue on being a presence in our society.
  • To explore the challenges facing Christian colleges and universities regarding diversity in Higher Education.
  • To build a network of advocacy and support for students, staff and faculty who are committed to enhancing an awareness of diversity, reconciliation and shalom on Christian colleges and universities.

Values

We believe that the process of reconciliation is central to the message of the gospel and to be lived out on a daily basis by believers in Christ.

Therefore, SCORR gives high priority to worship, prayer and the teaching from scripture the value of diversity and ministry of reconciliation.

We value to role of the arts in our education and edification as the Body of Christ. We serve a creative God and we should be a creative people of God.

Therefore, we give a significant place for a variety of artistic expression in our worship and instruction at SCORR.

We believe in the priesthood of all believers. As we come from diverse backgrounds and perspectives, all can make a significant contribution.

Therefore, we value dialogue across cultures, gender, ethnicity, and socio-economic status. At SCORR we are all students as well as teachers.

History of SCORR

The Student Congress on Racial Reconciliation (SCORR)
Looking Back to Look Ahead

In the summer of 1995 several of us who work in Christian colleges/universities gathered for a day to network and dialogue on the state of affairs regarding diversity initiatives on our respective campuses. We shared our ups and downs and sought to encourage one another to continue in this difficult but necessary work. At this meeting, I presented the vision I had to start a conference that would bring students from various Christian colleges/universities together for an annual gathering. It would be a time to celebrate our diversity and to share our stories with one another. They unanimously agreed that this was something I should do, and they would be in support of it. In February of 1996 we held our first conference. Humble beginnings were huge steps of faith.

The original name of the conference was called the Western Regional Multicultural Leadership Conference. From about 1996 to 1999 students and staff from colleges/universities from the Southern California region attended. In 2000 we changed our name to the Student Congress on Racial Reconciliation and hence the acronym, SCORR. By then the conference had grown to serve Christian colleges/universities along the West Coast.

In the ensuing years, SCORR expanded its scope as many students in leadership positions (Student Government, Residence Life, Chapel Programs), from the Biola campus as well as from a variety of other Christian colleges and universities, began to require attendance as a part of their leadership responsibilities. Topics thus ranged from “how is diversity relevant to student leadership” to “how do we address challenging issues on our campuses as well as society at large.”

Whether students are new to the conversation on diversity or eager to engage in a deeper process, the vision for SCORR remains to be an annual gathering where attendees experience, a) instruction that broadens their perspectives, b) dialogue that enhances critical thinking, and c) artistic expression that inspires creativity. As the vision statement reads, “Through active participation in SCORR, attendees will develop a greater vision for enhancing diversity, promoting biblical justice and inspiring leadership that results in a life-long process of building God’s Kingdom on earth.”

Among the visiting colleges and universities that have attended SCORR: Azusa Pacific University, Belmont University, Bethel University (Minnesota), Bethel College (Indiana), Cedarville University, Concordia University, Fresno Pacific University, George Fox University, Hope International University, Moody Bible Institute, Pepperdine University, Point Loma University, Samford University, Simpson University, Seattle Pacific University, University of Northwestern (Minnesota), Vanguard University, Wheaton College, Westmont College.

Today, we continue to grow as attendees now come from many parts of the country. The need is ever pressing to address issues facing, not only diversity in Christian Higher Education, but how does the Kingdom of God become a reality on our campuses. Creating opportunities for students, faculty and staff to dialogue together is an on-going challenge. SCORR seeks to be a part of the solution as we gather annually to address crucial issues facing the church, Christian colleges/universities and the world at large.

Plenary Speakers

 

Lena Crouso

Lena Crouso

Reverend Dr. Lena Crouso serves as the Chief Diversity Officer in the Office of Intercultural Learning and Engagement at Southern Nazarene University, and she is also an ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene. Dr. Crouso is the daughter of Asian-Indian immigrants and states that her journey from Hinduism to Christ, along with her diverse life path, has given her a heart and mind for the empowerment of all people through intercultural understanding and a desire to lead people in spiritual and emotional ways, empowering students to move toward social transformation and freedom. She is compelled by the two greatest commandments and desires to bring a deeper understanding to the question: “Who is my Neighbor?” She is a sought out international presenter and consultant on issues of race, diversity, equity and justice, seeking to build two-way bridges of reconciliation and learning opportunities that transform communities in systemic and substantive ways. She believes nothing matters more than to be a conduit of God’s inclusive love in individual and collective ways.

Dr. Lena Crouso holds a Ph.D. from Andersonville Theological Seminary, a Ph.D. from Bakke Graduate University, an Education Specialist Degree from Stetson University, a Masters of Education from University of Central Florida and a B.S. from Ohio University.



Trillia Newbell

Trillia Newbell

Trillia Newbell is an author and writer that addresses topics of diversity, faith and family. Her writings have been published in the Knoxville News-Sentinel, Desiring God, True Woman, Christianity Today, The Gospel Coalition and more. Trillia is a frequent speaker at conferences, churches, women’s retreats, colleges and seminaries. Her books include Sacred Endurance: Finding Grace and Strength for a Lasting Faith (2016), Fear and Faith: Finding the Peace Your Heart Craves (2015), and United: Captured by God’s Vision for Diversity (2014). Trillia is also an Acquisitions Editor with Moody Press where she works to discover new authors and assist them in developing their projects from start to finish.



Esau McCaulley

Esau McCaulley

The Reverend Canon Dr. Esau McCaulley is a New Testament scholar and an Anglican Priest. He completed his doctoral studies at the University of St Andrews where he studied under the direction of N.T. Wright. His research and writing focus on Pauline theology, African American Biblical interpretation, and articulating a Christian theology of justice in the public square. Dr. McCaulley, currently, serves as assistant professor of New Testament at Wheaton College in Wheaton, IL.

His second book Reading While Black looks at the tradition of African American biblical interpretation and argues that the Bible rightly understood and read from a decidedly black perspective can speak a word of hope to African Americans in the United States. Alongside these more academic works, he writes popular pieces. He is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times. He has also appeared in outlets such as Christianity Today and the Washington Post. He is also the host of the Disrupters Podcast and functions as a Canon Theologian for his diocese.



Eugene Cho

Eugene Cho

Reverend Eugene Cho is the president/CEO of Bread for the World and Bread Institute, a prominent non-partisan Christian advocacy organization urging both national and global decision makers to help end hunger – both in the United States and around the world. Eugene is also the founder and visionary of One Day’s Wages (ODW), a grassroots movement of people, stories and actions to alleviate extreme global poverty. The vision of ODW is to create a collaborative movement that promotes awareness, invites simple giving (one day’s wages) and supports sustainable relief through partnerships, especially with smaller organizations in developing regions. Eugene is also the founder and former Senior Pastor of Quest Church – an urban, multi-cultural and multi-generational church in Seattle, Washington. After 18 years, Eugene stepped aside at Quest in 2018.

Rev. Eugene Cho’s many passions involve leadership, justice, the whole Gospel and the pursuit of God’s Kingdom here on this earth. He travels throughout the world to encourage churches, non-profits, pastors, leaders, missionaries and justice workers – whether this happens in churches, arenas, conferences, universities, or as a guest in underground churches or refugee camps.


Breakout Sessions Speakers



Walter Augustine

Walter Augustine

Dr. Walter Augustine is the Director of Intercultural Education and Research at Biola University. A native of Chicago, Walter holds a Ph.D. in Theology and Ethics from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, where his dissertation focused on Christology and Economic Ethics. He is also an ordained Baptist minister who served as the Pastor of Discipleship at Merrill Avenue Baptist Church on the South Side of Chicago for ten years, and as assistant pastor at New Vision Ministries — a church plant in Fort Worth, Texas — for four years. Walter’s passion is discipling and developing the people of God to maturity in their relationship with Christ and their ministry for Christ.



Alicia Miller Andre

Alicia Miller Andre

Alicia Miller Andre is the Director of Intercultural Education & Assessment at Biola University. She works primarily with staff in the development of their intercultural knowledge, attitudes and skills by creating professional development opportunities. She also oversees the LEAD Scholars Program and leads Commune, an affinity group for white students. Her research interests include the intersection of spiritual formation, emerging adulthood and white identity. She holds a Master of Arts in Intercultural Studies from Fuller Theological Seminary. Alicia is married to Chase Andre, who is a faculty member in the Communication Studies department at Biola. With diverse community as a deep value, they live close to their church community in East Los Angeles.



David Bailey

David Bailey

David M. Bailey is a public theologian and culture-maker focused on building reconciling communities. David is the CEO and founder of Arrabon, and an active speaker, consultant and strategist for many national organizations around issues of reconciliation, cultural intelligence and culture-making. He is also the co-author of the Race, Class, and the Kingdom of God study series, the executive producer of the documentary 11am: Hope for America’s Most Segregated Hour and the Urban Doxology Project, and is rooted at East End Fellowship serving on the preaching team. David's greatest honor in life is to be married to his wonderful wife, Joy.



Erika Bertling

Erika Bertling

Erika Bertling is an intercultural educator and consultant who partners with institutions and individuals to teach, engage and transform. She speaks on themes such as racially conscious parenting, culturally responsive teaching, intercultural communication and leadership, racial identity formation, multiracial/TCK identity, and implicit bias awareness. Her lifelong, in-depth cross-cultural experience in multiple arenas informs her passion for the ongoing work of equity and inclusion.



William “Duce” Branch

William “Duce” Branch

William “Duce” Branch (a.k.a. The Ambassador) loves to preach Christ. Whether through careful biblical exposition or passionate gospel-driven rap, Duce (as he is nicknamed) aims to live out his belief in the sufficiency and primacy of God’s word. He now serves his current church, Imago Dei, in Raleigh NC, while also regularly preaching and rapping itinerantly. Duce is currently enrolled in a doctoral program at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, N.C., where he also serves as an adjunct professor for the College at Southeastern. He previously received a B.S. degree in Bible from Lancaster Bible College and a master’s degree in theology from Dallas Theological Seminary. These endeavors are apart of how he desires to model and promote his belief in the necessity of solid theological conviction that manifests itself in every facet of godly life and witness.



Chris Brooks

Chris Brooks

Chris Brooks is the host of the national syndicated radio program, ‘Equipped with Chris Brooks’, which is heard on over 200 stations throughout the U.S. and Canada. He is also the senior pastor at Woodside Bible Church in Metro Detroit. Woodside has fourteen campuses and sees nearly eleven thousand weekly worshippers. He graduated from Michigan State University with a B.A. in Finance, completed his M.A. in Christian Apologetics at Biola University and graduated from the Oxford Centre for Christian Apologetics. He is currently a doctoral candidate at Asbury Theological Seminary, where he is studying the Integration of Economics and Theology. He and his wife, Yodit, are the proud parents of Christopher, Zewditu (Zoe), Cameron, Judah, Sophia and Christyana.



Ray Causly

Ray Causly

Ray Causly, better known as Rayza (his rap alias in his younger years), graduated from Biola with a B.A. in Biblical studies and Talbot School of Theology with an M.A. in New Testament. He is the co-lead pastor at Living Way Community Church. Ray has been in pastoral ministry for over 20 years. He's a black man who has been married for 22 years to his wife Ruth, a white woman. He lived and taught in the City of Compton for over 15 years (Latino and Black community), pastoring a predominantly Korean congregation! They have four young adult children.



Derek Clark

Derek Clark

Dr. Derek Clark is a native of the hoods of South Central Los Angeles and Inglewood, C.A. He holds a B.S. in Business from Cal State Northridge, and an M.Div. and D.Min. from Talbot School of Theology. Dr. Clark has served the urban church in many volunteer positions including youth pastor and lead pastor. His teaching and pastoral interests include the priority of whole-life discipleship to Jesus and how it is to be expressed and live-out in all spheres of disciples of Jesus’ daily lives. He has a particular burden for discipleship to Jesus and the hood. He Has worked in the healthcare industry the last 30 years. He currently holds the position of senior director/Tama leader.



Kathryn Ecklund

Kathryn Ecklund

Dr. Kathryn Ecklund is a clinical psychologist, and a professor and chair of the psychology department at Azusa Pacific University. She has worked in the area of multicultural psychology in clinical, research and academic areas for more than 20 years. Her clinical work and scholarship in this area has centered around multicultural competence, cultural identity development, intersectionality of identity and the influence of social systems’ embedded values on identity formation.



Adam Edgerly

Adam Edgerly

Adam Edgerly currently serves as Director of Covenant World Relief and Development. He is the founding and former Lead Pastor of Newsong Los Angeles Covenant Church, a culturally diverse faith community where people are being reconciled to God and each other. Adam has also served the Evangelical Covenant Church denomination as Regional Director of Church Planting and Community Transformation, and as Associate Director of Evangelism and Prayer. Adam is a whole gospel person – his heart for oppressed and marginalized people flows out of his commitment to Christ. He earned his B.A. and M.A. in Intercultural Studies from Biola University and his M.B.A. from Emory University.



Octavio Javier Esqueda

Octavio Javier Esqueda

Dr. Octavio Javier Esqueda is a professor of Christian higher education in the doctoral program in educational studies at Talbot School of Theology at Biola University. He was born and raised in Guadalajara, México, where he graduated with a Licenciatura in Latin American Literature from the University of Guadalajara as well as two additional diplomas, one on religion and society and the second on journalism. He graduated from Dallas Theological Seminary with an M.A. in Christian Education and completed his doctorate (Ph.D.) in Higher Education at the University of North Texas. He and his wife Angélica have two children, Darío and Salma. Dr. Esqueda has several publications on theological education, Christian higher education and the Spanish Reformation.



Marty Harris

Marty Harris

Dr. Marty Harris is a clinical fellow of the American Psychological Association, Minority Fellowship Program. Registered consultant with the U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Justice, SAMHSA and other federal entities. He has served as a federal reviewer for the Hispanic Serving Institution grant (Title V) and carried out research on HSI areas related to Christian Higher Education, mental health, substance abuse and other higher education initiatives. He has served in senior leadership and/or faculty at five different Christian colleges/universities, including currently as president of LABI College and Latin American Theological Seminary.



La Dawn Prieto Johnson

La Dawn Prieto Johnson

La Dawn Prieto Johnson studied at USC where she focused on Latino street gangs and religious symbolism, education and mental health. She worked as a psychiatric social worker with LAUSD in the lowest performing schools in Los Angeles. It was in this capacity that she continued to study issues of race, class, gender and violence against the multicultural backdrop of the city, interacting with several local and governmental agencies to address growing issues of human trafficking, poverty, gang violence and prostitution. Her publications and efforts have brought her invitations from international agencies, most recently the “International Forum on Gender-based Violence and the Status of Women” in Kigali, Rwanda. Mrs. Prieto Johnson lives with her husband and two sons in Southern California.



Christina Lee Kim

Christina Lee Kim

Dr. Christina Lee Kim is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Rosemead School of Psychology, Biola University, and licensed clinical psychologist. She teaches undergraduate courses in developmental psychology and cross-cultural/ethnic issues in psychology. She also provides clinical supervision at the graduate level for doctoral students in clinical psychology. Dr. Kim’s research interests include multiculturalism and gender issues, racial and ethnic identity formation, and Asian American psychology.



Michal Meulenberg

Michal Meulenberg

Dr. Michal Meulenberg was born in the Middle East, grew up in Europe and came to the U.S. in 2005. She is passionate about mobilizing the next generation to be reconciliation workers in the way of Jesus in their own lives, locally and around the world. She teaching on topics related to Muslim-Christian relations, peace and conflict transformation, and grassroots peace building and justice efforts. Michal’s focus is on what the Bible has to say about how we relate to people of other religions, how to address injustices that people face around the world, and how to live out the love and message of Jesus in word and deed. Michal has an M.A. in English and Journalism, a Masters in Divinity, a Masters in Intercultural Studies and a Ph.D. in Intercultural studies with a focus on Muslim-Christian Relations.



Walter Myers III

Walter Myers III

Walter Myers IIIholds a Masters Degree in Philosophy from Biola University's Talbot School of Theology, where he is an adjunct faculty member in the Master's Degree in Science & Religion (MASR) program. When not working full time as an Engineering Manager for the little software company Microsoft, Walter devotes his time as Vice President of the Discovery Institute Southern California Chapter of the Science & Culture Network, contributing to the Discovery Institute Evolution News and Views website on parallels in the design of distributed computer systems and biological organisms, and writing libertarian-oriented political articles on topics such as education, immigration, and political philosophy.



Saul

Dr. Saul "Steve" Pinto

Dr. Saul "Steve" Pinto serves as the associate pastor of Faro Church, a multicultural and bilingual fellowship in the heart of Orange County, C.A. He is the author of The Silent Exodus: A first-hand experience and academic exploration of the complicated challenges of leading a Latino church in the twenty-first century. His knowledge of God's Word and love for people, mixed with his high energy and sense of humor, has been a powerful tool in God's hands as a keynote speaker at various youth events, camps and conventions. Additionally, he functions as an adjunct professor at Vanguard University and LABI College. His primary teaching areas are Christian worldview, youth ministry, effective leadership, discipleship making and expository preaching.



Joy Qualls

Joy Qualls

Dr. Joy Qualls is a nationally recognized writer and speaker. Joy currently serves as an Associate Professor of Communication Studies and Department Chair at Biola University. Joy writes and speaks on effective communication, leadership and who we are as image bearers of Christ. Joy has a passion for the local church and serving the body of Christ through teaching and consultation. Joy is married to Kevin (a licensed professional counselor) and together they teach on healthy relationships including marriage and parenting. They are parents to Blakeley and Soren as well as a fur baby, Madeleine. Joy is the author of God Forgive Us For Being Women: Rhetoric, Theology and the Pentecostal Tradition (Wipf and Stock, 2018) and is featured in several publications including Influence Magazine, The Table, and Biola Magazine as well as an author in several edited volumes.



Robert Chao Romero

Robert Chao Romero

Dr. Robert Chao Romero considers himself fortunate to be able to study himself for a living. With a Mexican father from Chihuahua and a Chinese immigrant mother from Hubei in central China, Romero’s dual cultural heritage serves as the basis for his academic studies. His research examines Asian immigration to Latin America, as well as the large population of “Asian-Latinos” in the United States. Before he joined the UCLA César E. Chávez Department Chicana/o Studies in 2005, Romero was a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the UCLA Department of History and School of Law. Romero received his J.D. from UC Berkeley and his Ph.D. in Latin American history from UCLA.



Bobby Scott

Bobby Scott

Bobby Scott is the Pastor of Discipleship at Community of Faith Bible Church in South Gate, C.A. He loves teaching the word of God and through the power of the Holy Spirit and watching God’s Word transform lives (2 Cor 3:18). Pastor Bobby is passionate about strengthening the urban church. He has pastored for over twenty-five years and enjoys writing. He is married up when God blessed him with his wife, Naomi. He loves his six kids (ages 15-24). As a UCLA alumnus, his two favorite teams are UCLA and whoever is playing USC.



Jasmine Ward

Jasmine Ward

Jasmine Ward is currently an academic instructor within the Los Angeles County Jail system. She received her Master’s of Science in school psychology from California State University, Northridge, and she also attended the University of Southern California where she attained her Masters of Social Work with an emphasis in community organization and planning. She previously has done work with Communities in Schools of the San Fernando Valley (CIS) where their main focus is re-entry and working with the local gangs and at-risk youth to provide a safer community. Her work with CIS has also allowed her to participate in coalition building and community mobilization for the all-around reform and improvement of the local, state, and national criminal justice system.



Allen Yeh

Allen Yeh

Dr. Allen Yeh is an Associate Professor of Intercultural Studies and Missiology at Biola University's Cook School of Intercultural Studies. He received his B.A. in Chinese history from Yale University, his M.Div. from Gordon-Conwell Seminary, and his D.Phil. in Latin American missiology from Oxford University. He is the author of Polycentric Missiology and co-author (along with Dr. Tite Tienou) of Majority World Theologies. He has been to over 60 countries on every continent.

Schedule

 

Wednesday, February 17, 2021

10–11 a.m. (PST)Keynote Address

Speaker: Dr. Reverend Lena Crouso
Session Link
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)

Breakout Session: Cultural Humility: A Path Inward, Outward and Forward

Speaker: Dr. Christina Lee Kim (Emerging - Expanding)

Session Link
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Choosing Love and Using “Leverage”: Upgrading the “Privilege” Discussion

Speaker:
William Branch (Expanding)

Session Link

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Does the Shoe Fit?: Developing Intercultural Education for Employees & Students

Speaker: Dr. Walter Augustine, Alicia Miller Andre (Expanding - Engaging)
Session Link
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: What to do in Red Sea Moments

Speaker: David Bailey (Expanding)
Session Link
2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Navigating Inherited Divisions in Christ’s Fam: Some Proposals for Students who Profess Christ

Speaker: Dr. Derek Clark

Session Link

2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Friends, Family and Matters of Justice: Engaging in Difficult Diversity Conversations with Loved Ones

Speaker: Dr. Kathryn Ecklund (Expanding - Engaging)
Session Link
2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Building Bridges: Engaging Cross Cultural Communication and Conflict

Speaker: Adam Edgerly (Emerging)
Session Link
2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: The Emerging Hispanic Demographic: Challenges and Opportunities for Christian Higher Education

Speaker: Dr. Marty Harris (Expanding - Engaging)
Session Link

 

Thursday, February 18, 2021

10–11 a.m. (PST)Plenary Address

Speaker: Trillia Newbell
Session Link
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: The Brown Church: Discussing Five Centuries of Latino/a Theology, Justice and Identity

Speaker: Dr. Robert Chao (Expanding - Engaging)
Session Link
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Doble Impacto: Navigating Two Worlds

Speaker: Dr. Saul "Steve" Pinto (Expanding)
Session Link
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Reviving Reconciliation

Speaker: Chris Brooks (Emerging - Expanding)
Session Link
2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Human Dignity in an Age of Mass Incarceration 

Speaker: Dr. Michal Meulenberg, Jasmine Ward (Expanding - Engaging)
Session Link
2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Embracing Jesus’ Good News Ministry and His New United Humanity

Speaker: Bobby Scott (Emerging)
Session Link
2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Unidos en la lucha: My Journey with Past and Present Hispanic Authors and Theologians (Luchadores)

Speaker: Dr. Octavio Esqueda (Emerging - Expanding)
Session Link
2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Do You See Me? Why God is Passionate about Race and You Should be too! 

Speaker: Ray Causly (Emerging)
Session Link

 

Friday, February 19, 2021

10–11 a.m. (PST)Plenary Address

Speaker: Dr. Esau McCalley
Session Link
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Reading While Black: Discussing African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in Hope

Speaker: Dr. Esau McCalley (Expanding - Engaging)
Session Link
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Glass Ceiling or Cage? A Closer Look at Race and Gender in Higher Education

Speaker: La Dawn Prieto Johnson (Expanding)

Session Link

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: How We Talk About Things Matters: Challenging Conversations in a Challenging Climate

Speaker: Dr. Joy Qualls (Emerging)
Session Link
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: K-12 Education and The School to Prison Pipeline: The Civil Rights Issue of Our Time

Speaker: Walter Myers III (Expanding - Engaging)
Session Link
2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Majority World Theologies: Theologizing from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Ends of the Earth

Speaker: Dr. Allen Yeh (Expanding - Engaging)
Session Link
2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Building Intercultural Skills for Effective Student Leadership

Speaker: Erika Bertling (Emerging)
Session Link
2–3 p.m. (PST)Breakout Session: Critical Race Theory: Identity Politics and the Gospel

Speaker: Adam Edgerly (Engaging)
Session Link
3–4 p.m. (PST)Poetry Lounge
Session Link

 

Saturday, February 20, 2021

10–11 a.m. (PST)

Story Slam

Session Link
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)Concluding Session

Speaker: Reverend Eugene Cho
Session Link

Breakout Sessions

Note to attendees: Workshop sessions are organized based on attendees level of familiarity and experience.

  • Emerging: New to the conversation.
  • Expanding: Have an understanding of basic concepts and desire to continue exploring.
  • Engaging: Committed to explore complexity and build skills for action and advocacy.

 

Wednesday, February 17, 2021

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)

Topic: Cultural Humility: A Path Inward, Outward, and Forward

Speaker: Dr. Christina Lee Kim (Emerging - Expanding)

Description: Cultural humility, a construct born out of the health sciences, is defined as “the ability to maintain an interpersonal stance that is other-oriented (or open to the other) in relation to aspects of cultural identity that are most important to the person” (Hook, Davis, Owen, Worthington, & Utsey, 2013). This workshop will present the construct of cultural humility alongside a biblical understanding of humility. It will also set out to discuss humility in the context of doing justice and loving mercy. What are the necessary elements of cultural humility? What are the barriers? Could the construct of humility, and specifically cultural humility, provide us a way forward in navigating the challenges of addressing multiculturalism on Christian campuses?

Session Link

Topic: Does the Shoe Fit?: Developing Intercultural Education for Employees & Students

Speaker: Alicia Andre, Dr. Walter Augustine (Expanding - Engaging)

Description: If you are wondering how to build an appropriate but challenging intercultural education curriculum for staff, faculty, students - or all three audiences - this workshop will walk participants through the process from theory to practice. The presenters will share how they developed curriculum for a student course and a professional development certificate for staff and faculty. They will also cover how to assess institutional readiness to allow for maximal cross-departmental ownership and partnership.

Session Link

Topic: Choosing Love and Using “Leverage”: Upgrading the “Privilege” Discussion

Speaker: William Branch (Expanding)

Description: There is much debate these days about who does and does not have “privilege” and what to do about this. The conversation can get contentious depending on what is meant by “privilege” and who supposedly does and does not have any. This session aims to advance the conversation toward the more excellent way of love, and the gospel-way of using one’s “leverage” for the sake of others. Come and receive a nuanced discussion about how we all can use God given “leverage” motivated by gospel love for the sake of others.

Session Link
Topic: What to do in Red Sea Moments

Speaker: David Bailey (Expanding)

Description: When it comes to the racial caste system in America, we have things we’re trying to leave behind us and obstacles to overcome in front of us. By looking at the past, we will learn from ways that folks have innovatively engaged in racial justice and healing through reconciling culture making.

Session Link

 

Wednesday, February 17, 2021

2–3 p.m. (PST)

Topic: Friends, Family and Matters of Justice: Engaging in Difficult Diversity Conversations with Loved Ones 

Speaker: Dr. Kathryn Ecklund (Expanding - Engaging)

Description: Family gatherings are often filled with fun and fellowship, but it can also be times of awkward tension when friends or family hold to different views and operate from different paradigms. When people develop their identity as an advocate and ally for marginalized or oppressed groups, navigating lifelong relationships can become challenging. One becomes aware of the entrenched internalized biases that people they care deeply about hold and express. In this session, participants will examine the complex dynamics of promoting justice with loved ones, learn skills for navigating difficult conversations with those they care about and develop a decision-making matrix for assessing how to most effectively engage with loved ones when issues of advocacy and justice are being considered.

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Topic: Building Bridges: Engaging Cross Cultural Communication and Conflict

Speaker: Adam Edgerly (Emerging - Expanding)

Description: God has intentionally designed his body to encompass a wide variety of people all walks of life. Whether it is in the local church or in the workplace, we all bring our differences in cultures, backgrounds and personalities. The fact that we think, act, communicate, and perceive one another based on our culture lens will inevitably cause misunderstanding and even conflict. Much of the time we may encounter, or even be the cause of a cross-cultural conflict and not even realize it. This session will address basic concepts of conflict and ways in which we can address different ways of addressing conflict so we may ultimately move to a more productive work environment.

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Topic: The Emerging Hispanic Demographic: Challenges and Opportunities for Christian Higher Education

Speaker: Dr. Marty Harris (Expanding - Engaging)

Description:Hispanic college enrollment, and graduation is one of the fastest growing segments in higher education. This trend is also echoed throughout many Christian Colleges and Universities. As educational expenses increase, federal and state grants become less available or accessible, the need to better serve the Hispanic demographic becomes more critical. This session will address the challenges and opportunities for Christian Colleges and Universities to embrace the emerging Hispanic demographic.

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Topic: Navigating Inherited Divisions in Christ’s Fam: Some Proposals for Students who Profess Christ

Speaker: Dr. Derek Clark (Emerging)

Description: Young people didn’t create the divisions, but inherited them. One generation defines racism, but another redefines it. One generation lays out plans and paths for racial reconciliation, but another shutters them and proposes new ones. The literature is vast and arguably impossible to mine. But some unique complexities face the young disciple of Jesus in 2021. This workshop will offer some modest proposals for the student follower of Jesus to navigate these inherited divisions.

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Thursday, February 18, 2021

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)

Topic: The Brown Church: Discussing Five Centuries of Latino/a Theology, Justice and Identity 

Speaker: Dr. Robert Chao Romero (Expanding - Engaging)

Description: In this session, Dr. Robert Chao Romero will discuss content from his recent book, Brown Church: Five Centuries of Latina/o Social Justice, Theology, and Identity. Romero considers how the Brown Church has responded to injustices throughout its history with the belief that God’s vision for redemption includes not only heavenly promises but also the transformation of every aspect of our lives and the world.

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Topic: Doble Impacto: Navigating Two Worlds

Speaker: Dr. Saul "Steve" Pinto (Expanding)

Description: In this presentation, Dr. Pinto encourages church leaders and emerging adults to recognize four stumbling blocks for Latinos who are stuck between two worlds and provides a way of reconciliation. Sharing from his newly published book, "The Silent Exodus," Dr. Pinto presents from first-hand experience and academic exploration. The presentation explains the complicated challenges of leading a multiethnic and multigenerational church in the twenty-first century, emphasizing young adults who are stuck between two worlds.

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Topic: Reviving Reconciliation

Speaker: Chris Brooks (Emerging - Expanding)

Description: There are deep divisions in our culture and these deep divisions have led to wounds, suspicion and distrust. This has created an environment in which many have chosen conflict as a response. The Bible teaches us as Christians that the pathway to healing is not through conflict but through reconciliation. There will be discussion as to what this looks like at the personal, church and community levels.

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Thursday, February 18, 2021

2–3 p.m. (PST)

Topic: Human Dignity in the Age of Mass Incarceration

Speaker: Dr. Michal Meulenberg, Jasmine Ward (Emerging - Expanding)

Description: The United States of America is home to 5% of the world’s population, but 25% of the world’s incarcerated population. However, it does not have higher crime rates than other developed countries. This crisis of a broken criminal justice system overwhelmingly impacts people of color. Why is that and what can we do about it? Come learn more!

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Topic: Embracing Jesus’s Good News Ministry & His New United Humanity 

Speaker: Bobby Scott (Emerging - Expanding)

Description: The opening chapters of the Bible tells our collective story. It tells us who God is, who we are, and what went wrong with us. Our sin broke our relationship with God and with one another. Later in Genesis 11, God thwarted our untied coup against him and divided the undivided human race into languages and separate lands. That ended the attack but that didn’t fix our problem. The human race became tribalistic with warring factions each willing to fight the other to make a name for itself. Tribalism isn’t new, it’s as old as the human race. The Good News is that God made a promise to Abraham that He would through his seed bring blessings to all of the divided families of the earth. Jesus is fulfilling that promise by making a new united humanity. This session will survey Genesis 1 through 11 and point to how Jesus is the answer to racism and tribalism in 1 Pet 2:9.

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Topic: Unidos en la lucha: My journey with past and present Hispanic authors and theologians (luchadores)

Speaker: Dr. Octavio Esqueda (Expanding)

Description: We all are theologians and we all are linked in the struggle (la lucha) to be messengers of shalom in a desperate world. Hispanic believers acknowledge that this struggle is experienced in everyday life (lo cotidiano), in community (la comunidad), and with hope for a better future (mañana). In this workshop, Dr. Esqueda invites you to share his journey, connecting with key Hispanic theology themes and authors that invite us to join them in la lucha.

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Topic: Do You See Me? Why God is Passionate about Race (and You Should be too!) 

Speaker: Ray Causly (Emerging)

Description: Why should we even care about our racial, ethnic and cultural differences? Why does racial injustice and reconciliation, especially in the church, matter? Is this simply the church jumping on the bandwagon of the latest social trend or are there greater and more God-glorifying reasons why we as Christians we should be passionate about the pursuit of these things? We will explore these questions through God's Word and the presenter, Ray Causly’s life experience of being a Black man, married to a white woman, having lived in a Black and Latino community as a pastor of a predominantly Asian church.

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Friday February 19, 2021

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (PST)

Topic: Reading While Black: Discussing African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in Hope

Speaker: Dr. Esau McCaulley (Expanding - Engaging)

Description: In this session, Dr. Esau McCaulley will cover content from his latest book, Reading While Black, and focus on themes such as African American Biblical interpretation and how various themes, when studied from this lens, apply to current racial and society tensions resulting in hope and moving the conversation on race in contemporary society forward.

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Topic: Glass Ceiling or Cage? A Closer Look at Race and Gender in Higher Education

Speaker: La Dawn Prieto Johnson (Expanding - Engaging)

Description: This session will take a closer look at the established rewards systems based in US academic institutions (O'Meara) and how race and gender intersect. Why do we see such low representation of certain groups within higher education? What can we do about it? Is there hope for change? Come prepared to engage critically in thought on these challenging issues.

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Topic: How We Talk About Things Matters: Challenging Conversations in a Challenging Climate

Speaker: Dr. Joy Qualls (Emerging - Engaging)

Description: This workshop will address how we engage in conversations on difficult or controversial subjects when the climate for those conversations is equally challenging. We will look at strategies for both interpersonal and public contexts as well as address social media and the need for more, not less conversation.

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Topic: K-12 Education and The School to Prison Pipeline: The Civil Rights Issue of Our Time 

Speaker: Walter Myers III (Expanding - Engaging)

Description: Since the brutal killing last summer in Minneapolis, Minnesota of George Floyd at the hands of a law enforcement officer, America has been on a heightened awareness of police abuse and brutality against black Americans both current and past. With respect to higher education, instead of a robust pipeline of black youth from urban areas headed to Christian universities, there is a robust pipeline of black youth in what is called the "school-to-prison pipeline," a phrase coined in the early twenty-first century referring to policies and practices that lead to an inordinate number of black youths becoming involved with the criminal justice system and finding themselves in prison. This talk will examine the causes and propose a way forward to reverse course and put our black youth on the path to higher education they so richly deserve.

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Friday February 19, 2021

2–3 p.m. (PST)

Topic: Majority World Theologies: Theologizing from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Ends of the Earth 

Speaker: Dr. Allen Yeh (Expanding - Engaging)

Description: The goal of every people group who have received the Gospel is eventually to be self-sustaining, self-governing, self-propagating, and self-theologizing. This workshop will focus on the last of that list, namely that God has endowed every culture with certain lenses/filters which -- while they could be limitations –– can also be valuable in bringing diverse insights into the character of God and how he works in this world. Attention will be given to the contributions of Africa, Asian, and Latin American theologies, and how people with ancestry from those continents can adapt these theologies for the United States as well.

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Topic: Building Intercultural Skills for Effective Student Leadership

Speaker: Erika Bertling (Emerging)

Description: What makes a great student leader? Sure, we can throw around words like “collaborative,” “inclusive” or “great communicator," but how do you get beyond just buzzwords? How can you have more effective and compassionate interaction with students who come from varying backgrounds and cultures? The goals of this workshop are: to provide you with vocabulary to have better dialogues, to inspire and not overwhelm you, and most importantly, to better equip you to be an effective servant leader — because intercultural skills are not optional for effective Kingdom living.

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Topic: Critical Race Theory: Identity Politics and the Gospel

Speaker: Adam Edgerly (Expanding - Engaging)

Description: Critical Race Theory (CRT) was developed by legal scholars and has since influenced various academic disciplines. Lately, particularly in the aftermath of the protests for racial justice from the summer of 2020, there are those who have framed CRT as incompatible with the Gospel. This session will explore CRT and ask the question, does CRT stand in opposition to the Gospel or can it be a constructive tool in our efforts to live the Gospel daily?


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Events

 

Poetry Lounge: Friday, February 19, 2021

 

Propaganda

Propaganda

Propaganda is a poet, political activist, husband, father, academic and emcee. With L.A. flowing through his veins and armed with a bold message, Propaganda has assembled a body of work that challenges and guides. Propaganda’s idea stems from where he sits at the intersection. He sees cultures cross and inspire one another, and can see the oneness of us all. Propaganda will cause you to nod your head but more importantly, he will stretch your mind and heart.



Shuree

Shuree

Shuree is the creative director at Urban Youth Workers Institute, a recording artist, writer, community outreach coordinator and a creative arts lead who has toured nationally. Shuree has led dynamic experiences using the power of artistic creation to bring diverse people together.



Kuya Paul

Kuya Paul

Kuya Paul (Kuya = "Big Brother") is a Filipino-American artist born and raised in Los Angeles, California. He is a local youth minister at Life Christian Fellowship in the San Gabriel Valley. For the past several years, he has also pursued the artforms of poetry and spoken word as evangelistic tools to spread the Gospel of Christ. Kuya Paul's poetry style can be characterized as hopeful and undeterred, always expounding on joy and optimism, even in the most dire of circumstances.



Treesje

Treesje

Treesje has been a faithful member of the spoken word community since 2008. Treesje’s poetry has been sought out and shared with various colleges, organizations, conferences and churches across the nation. Her poised and relatable work has been featured on stages with recording artists such as Luke James, Chrisette Michelle, Maxwell and Mali Music. Her poetry has also been featured twice on the TVOne Network's “Verses & Flow” (Seasons 2 and 4). She has worked for over a decade advocating for mental health awareness and cultural equity as a licensed school psychologist at the ground floor of public schools in L.A. County.



Story Slam: Saturday, February 20, 2021

Stories are a means of building bridges, finding common ground, and to celebrate the vast diversity that encompasses students, staff, and faculty across the Body of Christ. History lessons, insights into struggles for identity, the right to be heard and seen are the themes that often arise in stories. This event is a time to connect through our narratives and our common humanity.

 

Meet Our Storytellers

Chou LeMay

Choua LeMay

Director of Student Intercultural Programs (University of Northwestern)



Norlan Hernandez

Norlan Hernandez

Director, Jesse Miranda Center (Vanguard University)



Michal Meulenberg

Michal Meulenberg

University Professor, Instructor on Muslim-Christian relations, peace and conflict transformation (Biola University)



Erika Bertling

Erika Bertling

Intercultural Educator and Consultant