Courses | Music Performance, B.M.

Course Overview

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.

Summary

Below are some of the courses you’ll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising. For official program requirements see catalog for details.

Major Courses

Applied instruction in composition, piano, organ, harpsichord, voice, brass instruments, string instruments, woodwind instruments, percussion instruments, conducting, and improvisation.

Sight-singing diatonic melodies, major and minor scales and triads using moveable tonic solfege. Transcribing basic diatonic melodies, cadences and progressions. Reading, performing and transcribing rhythmic patterns in simple, compound and irregular meters.

The study of the following music fundamentals: elementary acoustics, keyboard layout, intervals, scales, key signatures, triads, figured bass, diatonic voice-leading, cadences, elementary harmonic progressions, meter, rhythm, time signatures and staff notation.

Using 153 materials as a foundation, this course encompasses the sight-singing and transcribing of diatonic and simple chromatic melodies with greater rhythmic complexity, triads in all inversions, dominant seventh chords and altered non-harmonic tones.

A study of common-practice diatonic harmony with emphasis on voice leading and harmonic progression. Includes part writing, non-harmonic tones, cadences, figured bass and Roman analysis.

Attendance at specified number and types of concerts each semester.

A skill improvement course focusing on rhythmic freedom and melodic embellishment. Hymns and worship choruses used as templates.

Focus on contemporary chords, voicings, and progressions; transposition; modulation; musical style. Hymns and worship choruses used as templates.

Attendance at specified number and types of concerts each semester. Three semesters of this course are required for graduation with a B.M. degree.

A historical and critical study of the period including important contributions in musical literature, theory and performance practice. Special attention will be given to the analysis of selected vocal and instrumental works.

A historical and critical survey of the period including important contributions in music literature, theory and performance practice. Special attention will be given to the analysis of selected vocal and instrumental works.

A historical and critical survey of the period including important contributions in music literature, theory and performance practice. Special attention will be given to the analysis of selected vocal and instrumental works.

The study of 20th century theory practice and compositional techniques within the context of the broad range of 20th century music literature.

Basic conducting skills; the psychology of conducting; observation of choral and orchestral rehearsals.

Emphasis on 18th century two- and three-voice techniques. Analysis of representative literature and writing of short style pieces.

The analysis of music from the various common practice periods, with emphasis on fundamental formal structural concepts and processes.

This course centers on the application of sight-singing and dictation skills acquired in 153 and 163, with particular focus on dominant and non-dominant seventh chords, altered non-harmonic tones, secondary dominants and chromatic melodies.

This is the final semester of common-practice diatonic harmony. Emphasis is on voice leading and harmonic progressions including altered dominants, borrowed chords, the Neapolitan Sixth chord, augmented chords and modulation.

This course centers on the application of sight-singing and dictation skills to complex diatonic and chromatic and modulating melodies, dominant and non-dominant seventh chords, altered non-harmonic tones, secondary dominants, the Neapolitan Sixth chord, and augmented sixth chords.

This course is centered on the study of chromatic harmony of the 19th century; Impressionism, and other early 20th century practices; contemporary popular harmonic practice and its symbols.

Preparation for applied major recital. (Length 30-45 minutes).

An introductory study of the interrelationships between music and culture through the examination of the music of varying cultures. Basic elements of music as they are found in world cultures will be studied.

Applied instruction in composition, piano, organ, harpsichord, voice, brass instruments, string instruments, woodwind instruments, and percussion instruments.

For the private teacher. Practical procedures in training a student in general musicianship, memorization, proper practice habits, sight-reading and other areas peculiar to specific instruments. Survey of graded literature and methods. Sections will be offered in areas such as: piano, organ, voice, wind and orchestral instruments.

Preparation for senior-level performance recital. (Length: 60 minutes).


Concentrations

Instrumental

Basic vocal training.

Keyboard technique and literature for the non-keyboard major.

Keyboard technique and literature for the non-keyboard major.

Emphasis on MIDI, notation and sequencing software, score and part preparation, editing and mastering of recordings, electronic music history, and basic acoustics.

An in-depth study of music literature as it relates to specific instruments, ensembles, periods of history, geographical locations, individual composers or ethnic groups. One or more sections offered every year in areas such as piano literature, organ literature, instrumental literature (strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion instruments), instrumental or choral literature for schools, American music, the symphony, the string quartet, the concerto, the sonata, etc.

Organ

Basic vocal training.

Group performance, discussion of performance practice and performance evaluation. Possible sections of voice, piano, organ and various wind and orchestral instruments.

Analysis of sight reading skills and procedures. Emphasis on development of ability to read with musical understanding and adequate fluency at first sight.

Continuation of Keyboard Sight Reading I. Analysis of sight reading skills and procedures. Emphasis on development of ability to read with musical understanding and adequate fluency at first sight.

Group performance, discussion of performance practice and performance evaluation. Possible sections of voice, piano, organ and various wind and orchestral instruments.

This course is designed to teach church service playing skills at an advanced level to pianists and organists. Areas of work include: harmonization, transposition, modulation, improvisation, hymn playing, accompanying (solo and choral) and repertoire.

Group performance, discussion of performance practice and performance evaluation. Possible sections of voice, piano, organ and various wind and orchestral instruments.

Piano

Basic vocal training.

Analysis of sight reading skills and procedures. Emphasis on development of ability to read with musical understanding and adequate fluency at first sight.

Continuation of Keyboard Sight Reading I. Analysis of sight reading skills and procedures. Emphasis on development of ability to read with musical understanding and adequate fluency at first sight.

Group performance, discussion of performance practice and performance evaluation. Possible sections of voice, piano, organ and various wind and orchestral instruments.

Emphasis on MIDI, notation and sequencing software, score and part preparation, editing and mastering of recordings, electronic music history, and basic acoustics.

This course is designed to teach church service playing skills at an advanced level to pianists and organists. Areas of work include: harmonization, transposition, modulation, improvisation, hymn playing, accompanying (solo and choral) and repertoire.

Study and performance of piano accompaniment for vocal and instrumental literature; discussion of styles and performance practices; experience in public performance.

Group performance, discussion of performance practice and performance evaluation. Possible sections of voice, piano, organ and various wind and orchestral instruments.

An in-depth study of music literature as it relates to specific instruments, ensembles, periods of history, geographical locations, individual composers or ethnic groups. One or more sections offered every year in areas such as piano literature, organ literature, instrumental literature (strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion instruments), instrumental or choral literature for schools, American music, the symphony, the string quartet, the concerto, the sonata, etc.

Voice

Keyboard technique and literature for the non-keyboard major.

Keyboard technique and literature for the non-keyboard major.

Lyric diction is taught in four semesters. All courses are 1-credit lab courses meeting two hours per week. These courses are designed for students studying classical vocal technique whose vocal repertoire consists of foreign language as well as English, and who, therefore, must learn to accurately pronounce and articulate foreign languages, and to know the meaning of every word in the text in order to convey it accurately. International Phonetic Alphabet, as it applies to the languages studied, and the pronunciation and basic grammar of the Italian language, will be taught.

German diction and grammar will be covered in the second semester.

This is the first of two semesters in the survey of song literature from the Middle Ages through the 20th century. This course will cover the history of solo song literature from the Middle Ages through the Classical period, and the history of the German lied from Schubert to Schonberg. Emphasis will be placed on how solo song influences or is influenced by major style trends of the various periods.

This is the second of two semesters in the survey of song literature from the Middle Ages through the 20th century. This course will cover the history of French, British and American song from the 19th through the 20th centuries, as well as songs of prominent composers in the National schools.

Lyric diction is taught in four semesters. All courses are 1-credit lab courses meeting two hours per week. These courses are designed for students studying classical vocal technique whose vocal repertoire consists of foreign language as well as English, and who, therefore, must learn to accurately pronounce and articulate foreign languages, and to know the meaning of every word in the text in order to convey it accurately. In the third semester (MUSC 253) French diction and grammar will be covered.

This semester will be a review of the pronunciation and grammar of all languages covered in the first three semesters, and will cover the pronunciation of Latin and Spanish, as well as the proper pronunciation and articulation of the English language.

Emphasis on MIDI, notation and sequencing software, score and part preparation, editing and mastering of recordings, electronic music history, and basic acoustics.

The study and performance of chamber operas, one-act operas, scenes from major operas and selected Broadway musicals.