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Instrumentation Capabilities at Biola

Biola’s School of Science, Technology and Health provides state-of-the-art instrumentation to support high quality teaching and research environments. This equipment is used in specific chemistry classes, but is also available for use by all SSTH students, including biochemistry, biology, chemistry, allied health students and more.

All equipment can be viewed within the chemistry labs on the third floor of the LIM Center. In addition to access through the lab classes mentioned above, students can also get training to use the equipment through directed research with our research-active faculty in CPE (CHEM 480). As these instruments are specialty instruments, students will have to receive training through a faculty mentor prior to use. For more information, please contact the CPE department.

Our Instrumentation

NMR Spectroscopy: (1) Magritek Spinsolve 80 MHz NMR (2) PicoSpin NMR

NMR Spectroscopy is an analytical tool used to determine the structure of a molecule. Briefly, a sample is dissolved in a solvent and placed in an external applied magnetic field, where it is exposed to radio waves. Depending on the environment of the atom (specifically, nucleus), different amounts of energy will be absorbed at different wavelengths. This information is plotted as intensity vs. chemical shift values. Analysis of the NMR spectrum will help us to determine the structure of the molecule. Note: A nucleus’s environment consists of the different atoms and groups of atoms surrounding it; thus, different nuclei will have different chemical shift values depending on their environment. This is the key behind structural determination. Students will use this instrument in Organic Chemistry Lab, CHEM 311 and CHEM 312, as well as directed research.

UV-Vis Spectroscopy: Agilent Cary 3500 Compact Peltier UV-Vis System

UV-Vis Spectroscopy is an analytical technique used for both qualitative and quantitative analysis, and is one of the most common absorption spectroscopy tools available. It is routinely used to analyze various analytes, including biological macromolecules, transition metal ions, aromatic compounds, or highly conjugated organic molecules. Our brand-new UV-Vis spectrophotometer boasts a dual beam for simultaneous analysis of the blank and the sample, and a 250 MHz xenon flash lamp, which gives the instrument a wavelength range of 190 – 1100 nm and scans at 150,000 nm/min. Students will use this instrument in directed research courses as well as Analytical Chemistry Lab, CHEM 350, and Physical Chemistry Lab, CHEM 406.

FTIR Spectroscopy: MIDAC FTIR Spectrophotometer (M4000-E and PRS)

Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy is another industry workhorse in the chemical sciences. Like its UV-Visible counterpart, it is used for both qualitative and quantitative analysis, and is another common absorption spectroscopy tool. The wavelength range of our two instruments is from 600 cm-1 - 4000 cm-1, which excites vibrational motion in a variety of functional groups within our molecules of interest. IR spectroscopy features prominently in organic chemistry, because it is used to provide information about the functional groups that are present in our samples for chemical identification. Students will use this instrument in Organic Chemistry Lab, CHEM 311 and CHEM 312.

Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: Agilent 8900 ICP-MS Triple Quad

Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a mass spectrometry technique for the purpose of elemental analysis. It features an inductively coupled plasma, which ionizes the sample. ICP-MS is commonly used for the identification and quantification of metals, and sometimes non-metals, in liquid samples, even at very low concentrations. The mass spectrometer gives the instrument the ability to distinguish between chemical isotopes. The ICP-MS is commonly used in water quality, food science, and the semiconductor industry. The instrument is part of Analytical Chemistry, CHEM 350, but can also be used in directed research projects.

High-Performance Liquid-Chromatography Mass Spectrometry: Waters Alliance e2695, with PDA and QDa

High-Performance Liquid-Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS) is an analytical tool that can be used to separate and identify chemical compounds within chemical mixtures. Typically, a liquid sample mixture is separated by passing the mixture through a chromatography column using a mixed aqueous-organic solvent. Compounds are separated based on their affinity for the stationary phase (on the chromatography column), with higher-affinity molecules showing up at later times on the chromatogram. The HPLC is equipped with two detectors: a photo-diode array detector (PDA, for UV spectroscopy), and quadrupole mass spectrometer (QDa). The HPLC-MS is found commonly in all chemical industries, including food sciences and pharmaceutical sciences. Students will use this technique in Organic Chemistry Lab (CHEM 311 and CHEM 312), as well as Analytical Chemistry (CHEM 350) and directed research.

Gas Chromatography – SRI 310C and 8610C Chromatographs

Gas chromatography (GC) is an analytical tool that can be used to separate and identify chemical compounds within chemical mixtures. Typically, a liquid sample mixture (of volatile compounds) is separated by passing the mixture through a chromatography column using a carrier gas (typically N2 or He). The GC is equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID). The GC is found in all chemical industries, but has historically been very prominent in the oil and gas industry. Students will use this technique in Organic Chemistry Lab (CHEM 311 and CHEM 312), as well as Analytical Chemistry (CHEM 350) and directed research.