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Courses | B.A. in Digital Journalism and Integrated Media

Below are some of the courses you’ll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Take a look at the list below to get an idea of the types of available courses. Also, be sure to review core curriculum requirements and the official program requirements in the Biola University catalog.

Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising.

Major Courses

This survey course gives an overview of the origins of journalism (particularly its technological developments), the mandate for press inquiry in the First Amendment, limits on that freedom in the U.S. and developed nations, implications for journalistic inquiry and storytelling in today's digital age, and the role of Christians in truth-telling. The course introduces students to the power of journalism to bridge cultural barriers and how journalism done badly contributes to societal discord and misunderstanding between disparate groups.

This course introduces students to fact-based storytelling that combines print and visuals in a web format that meets the needs of students aiming at careers in the convergent media of journalism. Students learn convergence through readings, discussion, observation and project work. Course content introduces basics in writing for web and for social media and exposes students to digital strategies and tools for media production. Students begin to develop their professional online presence as they create the scaffolding for their e-portfolio site. The course serves as a prerequisite to Digital Technology and Social Strategies for Media.

This course gives students introductory skills in writing for print and digital media, including narratives aimed at audiences who read, who listen and who watch (in video and social media formats). Students learn reporting as a research method, including interviews, use of public documents and data, and the ways visual media interacts with narrative online. Students learn how writing coaching and pitching of stories is part of writing in any journalistic setting. Cross-cultural understanding is introduced in the course as an influence on interviewing and narrative approaches.

Applied course in which students produce professional-level work in an area directly related to their major and/or concentration. Work in the practicum is designed as a springboard to competitive application for internships and career-entry in media and media-related ministry.

A portfolio-driven, introductive learning experience beyond the university classroom via working in a company, business or media-related organization. This course will allow students to explore their interest, aptitude and stamina for work within their chosen area of journalism or media-related organization or ministry. This course is aimed at providing students with a beginning portfolio of work suitable for applying to an advanced internship.

Study of theoretical approaches to the First Amendment as well as specific areas of concern to professional journalists such as defamation, privacy, fair trial, obscenity, copyright, shield laws, sunshine laws, etc. Exploration of applied professional ethics and contemporary professional issues of ethics for journalists. Note(s): This course was renumbered from JOUR 433.

A portfolio-driven, rigorous learning experience beyond the university classroom via working in an advanced internship with a company, business or media-related organization. This course will allow students to refine their interest, aptitude and stamina for work within their chosen area of journalism or media-related opportunity. This course is aimed at providing students with an advanced portfolio of work suitable for applying to entry level positions in their field. 

A culmination of the journalism student's academic career. This course is the laboratory where students transition from student to master of their craft, bringing together journalism fundamentals, approaches to storytelling, and technology and techniques necessary to produce material in various and/or applicable forms. Students bring their mastered understanding of craft together with their developed ability to think critically concerning their faith and the world around them, to ultimately produce intensive final projects of their choosing. Students will consider business practices as they develop proposals, researching their areas of focus and considering experts and best practices for their final projects.


Program-Specific Core Curriculum Courses

Senior level capstone seminar in which the student will search the Bible and the literature dealing with the topic(s) under discussion in the course leading to the discovery of means whereby the subject area may be 'integrated' with Biblical truth. The results of the research will be incorporated in a paper or project which will be critiqued by the seminar members and by the professor. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Biblical and Theological Studies.

A culmination of writing experiences and practices throughout the Core, this course uses discipline-specific texts and contexts for reading and discussion of ideas and methods in writing. Students will compare and critically analyze academic writing created by themselves and by experts; research and discover customs, values, and hallmarks of writing in their disciplines; use effective invention, drafting, revising, and proofreading methods for written work; learn to find, synthesize, and cite discipline-specific sources; and prepare essays and multi-genre artifacts useful in both academic and professional settings. 16-24 pages of polished prose, or its equivalent required. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - English.

Collection and presentation of business data, central tendency and dispersion measures for business analysis, sampling and inference for confidence intervals and hypothesis testing, business forecasting with simple regression. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Mathematics.


Concentrations

Broadcast

20 credits; see catalog for details.

A course in broadcast journalism in which students learn the craft of shooting TV news and informational video. They also study the process of video storytelling and how to create a compelling news package. Course includes shooting stand-ups, interview, b-roll and voice-overs, with an emphasis on editing and production.

Students learn basic techniques of broadcast news-writing, video shooting, editing and production. Classes consist of lecture/discussion and guidance in project work for telling visual and/or audio stories adapted to traditional broadcast settings as well as Web audiences.

Workshop course to provide an introduction to the field of audio production for radio, film and television. In this course students will learn and practice techniques for recording, editing, mixing and exhibiting radio, film and television sound. Introduces audio production techniques and equipment operation. Includes terminology, basic script writing, editing, producing commercials, public service announcements and news casting in a studio setting. Introduction to the place of sound (voice, music, sound effects) in radio, television, motion pictures, and the Internet. An overview of technology and its use in audio recording and editing; using analog and digital equipment.

This workshop introduces students to concepts and techniques for capturing video in a live studio environment and challenges the students to think and act as members of a production team. Students will gain the foundational concepts and techniques needed for understanding media creation while also giving them a useful and practical outlet with which to develop and hone their skills. This course will give students a greater understanding of how audio, camera work, lighting, editing, set design, and directing all contribute to video production within a studio based production environment.

Students will learn the essentials in shooting, editing and streaming compelling video; preparing them for the other video courses in the broadcast curriculum. Also, students will learn about multi-media reporting and a convergent newsroom, shooting DV and editing on Final Cut Pro, all necessary skills to become a competitive broadcast journalist.

Building on the Introduction to Digital Skills for Media course, this class has students further develop their use of contemporary media tools, building their expertise as media professionals and their understanding of how media theory informs what they do. Course content may cover web and app development, user experience (UI/UX), basic social media platforms and their uses of such from a media organization perspective, Search Engine Optimization (SEO) tools and methods as well as comprehensive digital strategy, and analytics. Further multimedia skills will be developed in the use of contemporary tools like drones, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

Students will be part of a team that will produce a streaming weekly webcast featuring news of the Biola campus, surrounding community and Los Angeles. Practical skills of producing a TV newscast, the language of TV, writing a reader, a VO, a VO-SOT, a news package, incorporating sound bites, reporter stand ups, and the timing and producing a newscast will be taught. A deeper understanding of multi-media reporting and a convergent newsroom, shooting DV and editing on Final Cut Pro will also be gained.

Students learn principles and practical application of television directing and the aspects of production that determine aesthetic quality. Techniques and concepts of video field reporting, production and video editing are introduced. Lecture, discussion, and projects give particular emphasis to developing critical and analytic abilities, and realizing practical applications of media ethics and aesthetics. Each student creates a web show utilizing green-screen production values. The finished show is uploaded to a student’s YouTube channel where they also learn analytics and techniques in creating an audience reaction and web hits.

Students acquire the basic skills necessary to work as a television news anchor and reporter. Study of delivery topics including: breathing techniques, voice pitch, how to read the teleprompter, on-air appearance and one of the most important skills necessary as a broadcast journalist, how to deliver a live report. Class projects include mandatory appearances on Biola's EagleVision newscasts, as both an anchor and reporter. May include a visit to a local television news studio.

This course is an advanced-level investigative journalism course where students spend the semester exploring topics deeply to present in final documentary form. This course guides students in digging underneath trends and breaking news to tell untold (or badly told) stories in ways that use character, scene and narrative storytelling to bring clarity and understanding to complex issues. The course relies on in-depth interviewing, use of public documents and data to create documentary scripts that become video productions in single or multiple episodes. The course will rely on either video or audio approaches using field and studio interviewing technology. Students bring their mastered understanding of craft together with their developed ability to think critically to ultimately produce intensive documentary-style projects. The course’s approach incorporates consideration of the Christian worldview that sees truth-telling as a biblical mandate.

A research and discussion course exploring theories of visual knowledge, the making of meaning through visual languages, and the ways journalists negotiate visual symbols and paradigms within disparate communities. The course analyzes digital SLR imaging, video imaging, and the uses of complementary elements alongside visuals including, but not limited to, text, audio and graphics. Cross-cultural elements of visual meaning are an integral part of the course content.

Visual Media

20 credits; see catalog for details.

An examination of the basics of photography-editorial, graphic and technical. This introduction presumes no previous knowledge of photography. Students learn to capture images and some video based on the above criteria with standard digital photographic equipment (DSLR based). It is meant to introduce the basics of the SLR camera as well as composition, use of light, moment capture and some basic video capture. Students also learn basic skills to edit photographs with the "digital darkroom" and prepare them for publications and web-based media.

This course, building on skills learned in JOUR 120, puts students in practical news-writing projects that use in-depth interviewing, use of public documents and data to support assertions. The course uses individual and group approaches to decision-making about news for short deadlines and longer ones, using writing, photos and video to tell stories that bring clarity to complex topics. The course gives preference to cross-cultural storytelling approaches and topics for projects will include stories that shed light on racial diversity issues and those on the cultural margins of society.

Workshop course to provide an introduction to the field of audio production for radio, film and television. In this course students will learn and practice techniques for recording, editing, mixing and exhibiting radio, film and television sound. Introduces audio production techniques and equipment operation. Includes terminology, basic script writing, editing, producing commercials, public service announcements and news casting in a studio setting. Introduction to the place of sound (voice, music, sound effects) in radio, television, motion pictures, and the Internet. An overview of technology and its use in audio recording and editing; using analog and digital equipment.

This workshop introduces students to concepts and techniques for capturing video in a live studio environment and challenges the students to think and act as members of a production team. Students will gain the foundational concepts and techniques needed for understanding media creation while also giving them a useful and practical outlet with which to develop and hone their skills. This course will give students a greater understanding of how audio, camera work, lighting, editing, set design, and directing all contribute to video production within a studio based production environment.

Students will learn the essentials in shooting, editing and streaming compelling video; preparing them for the other video courses in the broadcast curriculum. Also, students will learn about multi-media reporting and a convergent newsroom, shooting DV and editing on Final Cut Pro, all necessary skills to become a competitive broadcast journalist.

Practical study and experience in successful strategies for covering youth, varsity and professional sports for deadline news media (print, broadcast and Web). The course will emphasize techniques for interviewing, reporting and writing about sports for print and online media, but will include elements applicable to video and audio components of a convergent approach to sports journalism. Ethics of sports journalism practice from a Christian world-view are applied to the media marketplace through discussion and project-driven experience.

Laboratory, lecture and discussion course in advanced principles of identifying news, its sources and the connection of issues with trends. Course emphasizes in-depth (documentary-style) interviewing, variable deadline writing, introductory use of and analysis of online and retrievable databases, and other online resources. Students will resource professional tools for visualizing data, exploring ways the visual can help tell the story of numbers in compelling ways.

Building on the Introduction to Digital Skills for Media course, this class has students further develop their use of contemporary media tools, building their expertise as media professionals and their understanding of how media theory informs what they do. Course content may cover web and app development, user experience (UI/UX), basic social media platforms and their uses of such from a media organization perspective, Search Engine Optimization (SEO) tools and methods as well as comprehensive digital strategy, and analytics. Further multimedia skills will be developed in the use of contemporary tools like drones, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

A research and discussion course exploring theories of visual knowledge, the making of meaning through visual languages, and the ways journalists negotiate visual symbols and paradigms within disparate communities. The course analyzes digital SLR imaging, video imaging, and the uses of complementary elements alongside visuals including, but not limited to, text, audio and graphics. Cross-cultural elements of visual meaning are an integral part of the course content.

Students in this mastery-level course will explore in-depth a topic using a team approach that moves their inquiry from a core idea into a multi-part exploration that, by the end of the semester, becomes a finished book published by the department through on-demand technology. Book topics will vary, but urban and cross-cultural themes will be emphasized, pointing towards the needs and solutions being sought to help the marginalized and alienated within and around the American evangelical church and/or internationally. Projects will include reporting through written and visual form, and as needed, video storytelling and web development that enhances audience understanding of the book's topic.

An examination of the basics of photography-editorial, graphic and technical. This introduction presumes no previous knowledge of photography. Students learn to capture images and some video based on the above criteria with standard digital photographic equipment (DSLR based). It is meant to introduce the basics of the SLR camera as well as composition, use of light, moment capture and some basic video capture. Students also learn basic skills to edit photographs with the "digital darkroom" and prepare them for publications and web-based media.

This course, building on skills learned in JOUR 120, puts students in practical news-writing projects that use in-depth interviewing, use of public documents and data to support assertions. The course uses individual and group approaches to decision-making about news for short deadlines and longer ones, using writing, photos and video to tell stories that bring clarity to complex topics. The course gives preference to cross-cultural storytelling approaches and topics for projects will include stories that shed light on racial diversity issues and those on the cultural margins of society.

Workshop course to provide an introduction to the field of audio production for radio, film and television. In this course students will learn and practice techniques for recording, editing, mixing and exhibiting radio, film and television sound. Introduces audio production techniques and equipment operation. Includes terminology, basic script writing, editing, producing commercials, public service announcements and news casting in a studio setting. Introduction to the place of sound (voice, music, sound effects) in radio, television, motion pictures, and the Internet. An overview of technology and its use in audio recording and editing; using analog and digital equipment.

This workshop introduces students to concepts and techniques for capturing video in a live studio environment and challenges the students to think and act as members of a production team. Students will gain the foundational concepts and techniques needed for understanding media creation while also giving them a useful and practical outlet with which to develop and hone their skills. This course will give students a greater understanding of how audio, camera work, lighting, editing, set design, and directing all contribute to video production within a studio based production environment.

Students will learn the essentials in shooting, editing and streaming compelling video; preparing them for the other video courses in the broadcast curriculum. Also, students will learn about multi-media reporting and a convergent newsroom, shooting DV and editing on Final Cut Pro, all necessary skills to become a competitive broadcast journalist.

Explores reporting and documentation through the visual medium of still images. Students photograph assignments under working press and commercial-type conditions and advance their skills using the DSLR camera.

Practical study and experience in successful strategies for covering youth, varsity and professional sports for deadline news media (print, broadcast and Web). The course will emphasize techniques for interviewing, reporting and writing about sports for print and online media, but will include elements applicable to video and audio components of a convergent approach to sports journalism. Ethics of sports journalism practice from a Christian world-view are applied to the media marketplace through discussion and project-driven experience.

Laboratory, lecture and discussion course in advanced principles of identifying news, its sources and the connection of issues with trends. Course emphasizes in-depth (documentary-style) interviewing, variable deadline writing, introductory use of and analysis of online and retrievable databases, and other online resources. Students will resource professional tools for visualizing data, exploring ways the visual can help tell the story of numbers in compelling ways.

Building on the Introduction to Digital Skills for Media course, this class has students further develop their use of contemporary media tools, building their expertise as media professionals and their understanding of how media theory informs what they do. Course content may cover web and app development, user experience (UI/UX), basic social media platforms and their uses of such from a media organization perspective, Search Engine Optimization (SEO) tools and methods as well as comprehensive digital strategy, and analytics. Further multimedia skills will be developed in the use of contemporary tools like drones, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

Continues the exploration of reporting and interpreting the news through photo documentary and photo analysis while advancing techniques of visual reporting and interpreting news. Students work together to compile photos stories into a thematic presentation, working under deadline and learning production skills as well as the demonstration of advanced visual storytelling skills.

A research and discussion course exploring theories of visual knowledge, the making of meaning through visual languages, and the ways journalists negotiate visual symbols and paradigms within disparate communities. The course analyzes digital SLR imaging, video imaging, and the uses of complementary elements alongside visuals including, but not limited to, text, audio and graphics. Cross-cultural elements of visual meaning are an integral part of the course content.

Students in this mastery-level course will explore in-depth a topic using a team approach that moves their inquiry from a core idea into a multi-part exploration that, by the end of the semester, becomes a finished book published by the department through on-demand technology. Book topics will vary, but urban and cross-cultural themes will be emphasized, pointing towards the needs and solutions being sought to help the marginalized and alienated within and around the American evangelical church and/or internationally. Projects will include reporting through written and visual form, and as needed, video storytelling and web development that enhances audience understanding of the book's topic.

Cross-Cultural Media

Students in this concentration will complete a minimum of 49 credits.

Exploration of foundational issues related to international and intercultural ministry, including foundational models of global Christian witness, mission formation, contextualization, and an overview of various global realities (poverty; international development; Islam; unreached peoples; urbanization; globalization; and peace, security and conflict) from a Biblical perspective. Career tracks in intercultural and global service are explored.

Exploration of the cross-cultural transition process, focusing on healthy adjustment as a sojourner in a new culture. Attention given to understanding and applying grace to oneself and others, discerning cultural values, conflict styles, social stratification and celebration.

Key theories, models and macro concerns in development, and historic overview of the practice of relief and development. Exploration of topics such as poverty, gender, human rights, debt, nationalism and economic development, globalization, and transformational/holistic development. Provides a broad survey of development concepts, trends, and challenges.

An introductory study of the city as the center of religion, economics, politics and social life for all major cultures. Focuses on forming a professional response for ministry in the city.

Principles and processes of communicating from one culture to another. Focus on different perceptions, ways of thinking, values, non-verbal expression, language expression and subgroups within a culture as they relate to the media and the message.

The use of social science research techniques to learn about the people, needs and opportunities for living, working, and serving in the city. Special attention is given to researching people groups and the adaptations they make to urban contexts.

An examination of the basics of photography-editorial, graphic and technical. This introduction presumes no previous knowledge of photography. Students learn to capture images and some video based on the above criteria with standard digital photographic equipment (DSLR based). It is meant to introduce the basics of the SLR camera as well as composition, use of light, moment capture and some basic video capture. Students also learn basic skills to edit photographs with the "digital darkroom" and prepare them for publications and web-based media.

A course in broadcast journalism in which students learn the craft of shooting TV news and informational video. They also study the process of video storytelling and how to create a compelling news package. Course includes shooting stand-ups, interview, b-roll and voice-overs, with an emphasis on editing and production.

This course, building on skills learned in JOUR 120, puts students in practical news-writing projects that use in-depth interviewing, use of public documents and data to support assertions. The course uses individual and group approaches to decision-making about news for short deadlines and longer ones, using writing, photos and video to tell stories that bring clarity to complex topics. The course gives preference to cross-cultural storytelling approaches and topics for projects will include stories that shed light on racial diversity issues and those on the cultural margins of society.

Students learn basic techniques of broadcast news-writing, video shooting, editing and production. Classes consist of lecture/discussion and guidance in project work for telling visual and/or audio stories adapted to traditional broadcast settings as well as Web audiences.

Practical study and experience in successful strategies for covering youth, varsity and professional sports for deadline news media (print, broadcast and Web). The course will emphasize techniques for interviewing, reporting and writing about sports for print and online media, but will include elements applicable to video and audio components of a convergent approach to sports journalism. Ethics of sports journalism practice from a Christian world-view are applied to the media marketplace through discussion and project-driven experience.

Laboratory, lecture and discussion course in advanced principles of identifying news, its sources and the connection of issues with trends. Course emphasizes in-depth (documentary-style) interviewing, variable deadline writing, introductory use of and analysis of online and retrievable databases, and other online resources. Students will resource professional tools for visualizing data, exploring ways the visual can help tell the story of numbers in compelling ways.

Building on the Introduction to Digital Skills for Media course, this class has students further develop their use of contemporary media tools, building their expertise as media professionals and their understanding of how media theory informs what they do. Course content may cover web and app development, user experience (UI/UX), basic social media platforms and their uses of such from a media organization perspective, Search Engine Optimization (SEO) tools and methods as well as comprehensive digital strategy, and analytics. Further multimedia skills will be developed in the use of contemporary tools like drones, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

Students will be part of a team that will produce a streaming weekly webcast featuring news of the Biola campus, surrounding community and Los Angeles. Practical skills of producing a TV newscast, the language of TV, writing a reader, a VO, a VO-SOT, a news package, incorporating sound bites, reporter stand ups, and the timing and producing a newscast will be taught. A deeper understanding of multi-media reporting and a convergent newsroom, shooting DV and editing on Final Cut Pro will also be gained.

Exploration of aesthetics and design with emphasis on copy editing and marking skills necessary for quality presentation of material both in printed and digital journalistic venues. Practice of copy editing with attention to style, grammar, punctuation, writing headlines, cutlines, selection of type, use of color and art as all relate to print or digital presentation. Because of this, SEO and analytics are further explored from the management position.

Principles of writing for targeted audiences that win readers and editors at niche and mainstream magazines. Students move articles from inception to querying through the revision processes of medium and long-form features and in-depth article writing. Course includes elements of business self-management, budgeting and copyright guidelines.

Students learn principles and practical application of television directing and the aspects of production that determine aesthetic quality. Techniques and concepts of video field reporting, production and video editing are introduced. Lecture, discussion, and projects give particular emphasis to developing critical and analytic abilities, and realizing practical applications of media ethics and aesthetics. Each student creates a web show utilizing green-screen production values. The finished show is uploaded to a student’s YouTube channel where they also learn analytics and techniques in creating an audience reaction and web hits.

Students acquire the basic skills necessary to work as a television news anchor and reporter. Study of delivery topics including: breathing techniques, voice pitch, how to read the teleprompter, on-air appearance and one of the most important skills necessary as a broadcast journalist, how to deliver a live report. Class projects include mandatory appearances on Biola's EagleVision newscasts, as both an anchor and reporter. May include a visit to a local television news studio.

A course focusing on broadcast and/or print or Web news from an international perspective. Students follow news stories with international significance, comparing story content, coverage and decision-making with the national media in the United States. Guest speakers include experts from the international news media.

This course is an advanced-level investigative journalism course where students spend the semester exploring topics deeply to present in final documentary form. This course guides students in digging underneath trends and breaking news to tell untold (or badly told) stories in ways that use character, scene and narrative storytelling to bring clarity and understanding to complex issues. The course relies on in-depth interviewing, use of public documents and data to create documentary scripts that become video productions in single or multiple episodes. The course will rely on either video or audio approaches using field and studio interviewing technology. Students bring their mastered understanding of craft together with their developed ability to think critically to ultimately produce intensive documentary-style projects. The course’s approach incorporates consideration of the Christian worldview that sees truth-telling as a biblical mandate.

A research and discussion course exploring theories of visual knowledge, the making of meaning through visual languages, and the ways journalists negotiate visual symbols and paradigms within disparate communities. The course analyzes digital SLR imaging, video imaging, and the uses of complementary elements alongside visuals including, but not limited to, text, audio and graphics. Cross-cultural elements of visual meaning are an integral part of the course content.

A capstone course for journalism majors organized in a seminar style in which students review the philosophies of formative thinkers behind American journalism (print, broadcast and Internet), and examine the philosophy of a journalist whom they'll shadow. The course culminates in each student's examination of his or her own philosophy of journalism and sense of calling as a believer practicing journalism or public relations or as an influence in the marketplace of public opinion.

Students in this mastery-level course will explore in-depth a topic using a team approach that moves their inquiry from a core idea into a multi-part exploration that, by the end of the semester, becomes a finished book published by the department through on-demand technology. Book topics will vary, but urban and cross-cultural themes will be emphasized, pointing towards the needs and solutions being sought to help the marginalized and alienated within and around the American evangelical church and/or internationally. Projects will include reporting through written and visual form, and as needed, video storytelling and web development that enhances audience understanding of the book's topic.

This is an introductory course designed to build basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop intercultural communicative competence at an intermediate low-mid proficiency level. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This Spanish language immersion course is a community-based, experiential learning opportunity in Spanish which will consist of Spanish in a classroom setting focusing on the exploration of local varieties of Spanish and Latino culture. Students are required to live in a Christian host family and participate in mandatory excursions and service learning in the target language during afternoon, evening, and weekend hours. The course will normally be offered during summer session.

This course offers a real world setting for the development of intercultural communicative competence under the guidance of our faculty. Study tours may include homestays, exploratory excursions, internships and academic service learning as our students practice their language skills while in direct contact with Hispanic culture.

This survey course provides a panoramic view of the civilization and culture of the Spanish-speaking world (Spain, Spanish America, United States) from its early origins to the present day. Emphasis will be given to literary, artistic and cultural productions of each respective region. This class aims to help students attain an advanced level of intercultural communication in the target language with practice in the four skill areas (listening, speaking, reading, and writing).

For the language preparation in the cross-cultural concentration, students are required to choose from the following options for an additional 4 credits of language study:

This is an introductory course designed to build basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate low proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an introductory course designed to build basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate low-mid proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an intermediate course designed to further develop basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate mid-high proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an introductory course designed to build basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate low proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an introductory course designed to build basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate low-mid proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an intermediate course designed to further develop basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate mid-high proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

A continuation of Intermediate-level French, this course will cover typical aspects of French daily life with special emphasis on idioms, useful phrases and conversational patterns. Topics deal with true to life situations and practical aspects of the language. Lecture/Lab Hours: Three hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

Provides intensive practice and instruction in French conversation at the high-intermediate level. It will help students develop a strong command of grammar structures, build their lexical repertoire, as well as orient them to the uses of formal and informal uses of French. Students will develop critical thinking skills and will be given the tools for approaching, and understanding a wide variety of texts, as well as develop strategies for expressing themselves with fluency and spontaneity in conversation. Students will also be guided through the writing process in order to guide them to produce well-structured texts in French.

This course will develop the students' command of the linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competencies of the language. At this level, learners will be able to understand without difficulty almost everything heard or read. Learners will be able to express themselves in a fluent, precise and spontaneous way, and differentiate various connotations and levels of meaning in complex texts. Learners will produce well structured written texts on a wide variety of topics.

This is an introductory course designed to build basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate low proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an introductory course designed to build basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate low-mid proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an intermediate course designed to further develop basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate mid-high proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an introductory course designed to build basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate low proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an introductory course designed to build basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate low-mid proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an intermediate course designed to further develop basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop inter-cultural communicative competence at an intermediate mid-high proficiency level. Lecture/Lab Hours: Five hours each week. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This is an intermediate course designed to further develop basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop intercultural communicative competence at an intermediate-high proficiency level.

This course will build upon and further develop the informal knowledge of Spanish that heritage learners bring to the classroom — usually from family and neighborhood exposure to the language — and cultivate formal speaking, reading, and writing abilities. Core Curriculum: Approved for Core - Foreign Language.

This course will help develop students' vocabulary and register while reviewing advanced grammatical structures of Spanish through thematic units, which target the development of advanced-level oral and written proficiency through readings and discussion of Spanish texts and culture broadly defined (film, literature, newspapers, pop culture, etc.), as well as writing assignments and oral presentations.

This course will help develop students' vocabulary and register while reviewing advanced grammatical structures of Spanish through thematic units, which target the development of advanced-level oral and written proficiency through readings and discussion of Spanish texts and culture broadly defined (film, literature, newspapers, pop culture, etc.), as well as writing assignments and oral presentations.

This course seeks to broaden the informal knowledge of Spanish that heritage learners bring to the classroom and focuses primarily on the development of formal speaking, reading, and writing abilities across a variety of topics and genres.

This course seeks to broaden the informal knowledge of Spanish that heritage learners bring to the classroom and focuses primarily on the development of formal speaking, reading, and writing abilities across a variety of topics and genres.

Writing and Publishing

An examination of the basics of photography-editorial, graphic and technical. This introduction presumes no previous knowledge of photography. Students learn to capture images and some video based on the above criteria with standard digital photographic equipment (DSLR based). It is meant to introduce the basics of the SLR camera as well as composition, use of light, moment capture and some basic video capture. Students also learn basic skills to edit photographs with the "digital darkroom" and prepare them for publications and web-based media.

A course in broadcast journalism in which students learn the craft of shooting TV news and informational video. They also study the process of video storytelling and how to create a compelling news package. Course includes shooting stand-ups, interview, b-roll and voice-overs, with an emphasis on editing and production.

This course, building on skills learned in JOUR 120, puts students in practical news-writing projects that use in-depth interviewing, use of public documents and data to support assertions. The course uses individual and group approaches to decision-making about news for short deadlines and longer ones, using writing, photos and video to tell stories that bring clarity to complex topics. The course gives preference to cross-cultural storytelling approaches and topics for projects will include stories that shed light on racial diversity issues and those on the cultural margins of society.

Laboratory, lecture and discussion course in advanced principles of identifying news, its sources and the connection of issues with trends. Course emphasizes in-depth (documentary-style) interviewing, variable deadline writing, introductory use of and analysis of online and retrievable databases, and other online resources. Students will resource professional tools for visualizing data, exploring ways the visual can help tell the story of numbers in compelling ways.

Building on the Introduction to Digital Skills for Media course, this class has students further develop their use of contemporary media tools, building their expertise as media professionals and their understanding of how media theory informs what they do. Course content may cover web and app development, user experience (UI/UX), basic social media platforms and their uses of such from a media organization perspective, Search Engine Optimization (SEO) tools and methods as well as comprehensive digital strategy, and analytics. Further multimedia skills will be developed in the use of contemporary tools like drones, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

Exploration of aesthetics and design with emphasis on copy editing and marking skills necessary for quality presentation of material both in printed and digital journalistic venues. Practice of copy editing with attention to style, grammar, punctuation, writing headlines, cutlines, selection of type, use of color and art as all relate to print or digital presentation. Because of this, SEO and analytics are further explored from the management position.

Principles of writing for targeted audiences that win readers and editors at niche and mainstream magazines. Students move articles from inception to querying through the revision processes of medium and long-form features and in-depth article writing. Course includes elements of business self-management, budgeting and copyright guidelines.

A course focusing on broadcast and/or print or Web news from an international perspective. Students follow news stories with international significance, comparing story content, coverage and decision-making with the national media in the United States. Guest speakers include experts from the international news media.

This course is an advanced-level investigative journalism course where students spend the semester exploring topics deeply to present in final documentary form. This course guides students in digging underneath trends and breaking news to tell untold (or badly told) stories in ways that use character, scene and narrative storytelling to bring clarity and understanding to complex issues. The course relies on in-depth interviewing, use of public documents and data to create documentary scripts that become video productions in single or multiple episodes. The course will rely on either video or audio approaches using field and studio interviewing technology. Students bring their mastered understanding of craft together with their developed ability to think critically to ultimately produce intensive documentary-style projects. The course’s approach incorporates consideration of the Christian worldview that sees truth-telling as a biblical mandate.

A capstone course for journalism majors organized in a seminar style in which students review the philosophies of formative thinkers behind American journalism (print, broadcast and Internet), and examine the philosophy of a journalist whom they'll shadow. The course culminates in each student's examination of his or her own philosophy of journalism and sense of calling as a believer practicing journalism or public relations or as an influence in the marketplace of public opinion.

Students in this mastery-level course will explore in-depth a topic using a team approach that moves their inquiry from a core idea into a multi-part exploration that, by the end of the semester, becomes a finished book published by the department through on-demand technology. Book topics will vary, but urban and cross-cultural themes will be emphasized, pointing towards the needs and solutions being sought to help the marginalized and alienated within and around the American evangelical church and/or internationally. Projects will include reporting through written and visual form, and as needed, video storytelling and web development that enhances audience understanding of the book's topic.

Digital Journalism

An examination of the basics of photography-editorial, graphic and technical. This introduction presumes no previous knowledge of photography. Students learn to capture images and some video based on the above criteria with standard digital photographic equipment (DSLR based). It is meant to introduce the basics of the SLR camera as well as composition, use of light, moment capture and some basic video capture. Students also learn basic skills to edit photographs with the "digital darkroom" and prepare them for publications and web-based media.

A course in broadcast journalism in which students learn the craft of shooting TV news and informational video. They also study the process of video storytelling and how to create a compelling news package. Course includes shooting stand-ups, interview, b-roll and voice-overs, with an emphasis on editing and production.

This course, building on skills learned in JOUR 120, puts students in practical news-writing projects that use in-depth interviewing, use of public documents and data to support assertions. The course uses individual and group approaches to decision-making about news for short deadlines and longer ones, using writing, photos and video to tell stories that bring clarity to complex topics. The course gives preference to cross-cultural storytelling approaches and topics for projects will include stories that shed light on racial diversity issues and those on the cultural margins of society.

Workshop course to provide an introduction to the field of audio production for radio, film and television. In this course students will learn and practice techniques for recording, editing, mixing and exhibiting radio, film and television sound. Introduces audio production techniques and equipment operation. Includes terminology, basic script writing, editing, producing commercials, public service announcements and news casting in a studio setting. Introduction to the place of sound (voice, music, sound effects) in radio, television, motion pictures, and the Internet. An overview of technology and its use in audio recording and editing; using analog and digital equipment.

This workshop introduces students to concepts and techniques for capturing video in a live studio environment and challenges the students to think and act as members of a production team. Students will gain the foundational concepts and techniques needed for understanding media creation while also giving them a useful and practical outlet with which to develop and hone their skills. This course will give students a greater understanding of how audio, camera work, lighting, editing, set design, and directing all contribute to video production within a studio based production environment.

Students will learn the essentials in shooting, editing and streaming compelling video; preparing them for the other video courses in the broadcast curriculum. Also, students will learn about multi-media reporting and a convergent newsroom, shooting DV and editing on Final Cut Pro, all necessary skills to become a competitive broadcast journalist.

A course introducing students to digital approaches to design principles and techniques for visually communicating ideas. Fundamental principles of design and elements of line, form, color, texture, value, shape will be resourced in hands-on practice. Creating user-focused experiences on the web and in apps will be integral to the student design development. These digital designers will resource electronic procedures and tools to produce and edit websites and elements for online distribution, including landing pages, banners and ads, and email marketing collateral. They may work with Wordpress and in languages such as HTML5, CSS3 JavaScript. Students will understand and consider accessibility as well as functionality of design and systems. Materials they create, format, illustrate and design will be used for creative concept presentation to clients as well. This is an entry-level course, assuming students have little previous experience with coding, UX/UI, or tools for design which may include the Adobe Suite products.

Laboratory, lecture and discussion course in advanced principles of identifying news, its sources and the connection of issues with trends. Course emphasizes in-depth (documentary-style) interviewing, variable deadline writing, introductory use of and analysis of online and retrievable databases, and other online resources. Students will resource professional tools for visualizing data, exploring ways the visual can help tell the story of numbers in compelling ways.

Building on the Introduction to Digital Skills for Media course, this class has students further develop their use of contemporary media tools, building their expertise as media professionals and their understanding of how media theory informs what they do. Course content may cover web and app development, user experience (UI/UX), basic social media platforms and their uses of such from a media organization perspective, Search Engine Optimization (SEO) tools and methods as well as comprehensive digital strategy, and analytics. Further multimedia skills will be developed in the use of contemporary tools like drones, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

Students will be part of a team that will produce a streaming weekly webcast featuring news of the Biola campus, surrounding community and Los Angeles. Practical skills of producing a TV newscast, the language of TV, writing a reader, a VO, a VO-SOT, a news package, incorporating sound bites, reporter stand ups, and the timing and producing a newscast will be taught. A deeper understanding of multi-media reporting and a convergent newsroom, shooting DV and editing on Final Cut Pro will also be gained.

Exploration of aesthetics and design with emphasis on copy editing and marking skills necessary for quality presentation of material both in printed and digital journalistic venues. Practice of copy editing with attention to style, grammar, punctuation, writing headlines, cutlines, selection of type, use of color and art as all relate to print or digital presentation. Because of this, SEO and analytics are further explored from the management position.

The media world has been completely transformed with the evolution of digital technologies. From social media to search engine strategizing and advertising, the media (as well as corporate and non-profit organizations) has tremendous opportunity to enhance the distribution of information as well as the communication with their audiences. This course is designed for students to delve into the exploration of best practices for media professionals as well as emerging standards and trends in the field.

A research and discussion course exploring theories of visual knowledge, the making of meaning through visual languages, and the ways journalists negotiate visual symbols and paradigms within disparate communities. The course analyzes digital SLR imaging, video imaging, and the uses of complementary elements alongside visuals including, but not limited to, text, audio and graphics. Cross-cultural elements of visual meaning are an integral part of the course content.

A capstone course for journalism majors organized in a seminar style in which students review the philosophies of formative thinkers behind American journalism (print, broadcast and Internet), and examine the philosophy of a journalist whom they'll shadow. The course culminates in each student's examination of his or her own philosophy of journalism and sense of calling as a believer practicing journalism or public relations or as an influence in the marketplace of public opinion.

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