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Courses | B.A. in English

Below are some of the courses you'll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Take a look at the list below to get an idea of the types of available courses. Also, be sure to review core curriculum requirements and the official program requirements in the Biola University catalog.

Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program's academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising.

Major Courses

Study of the theories of writing and rhetorical models. Extensive practice in writing.

A study of selected writers and their works from the early Middle Ages to 1616. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Literature credit. Grade Mode: A.

A study of selected writers from the Age of Realism through the present day. 

Introductory language course for education students: history of language, grammatical systems, usage/composition; teaching applications.

Poetry workshop. Students will read and critique each other's work, study selected modern and contemporary poems and investigate the creative writing process.

Fiction workshop. Students will read and critique each other's work, study selected modern and contemporary short stories and investigate the creative writing process.

Specific eras and movements in American literature. Two or more sections offered every year. The sections include American literature from Colonial America, the Constitution to the Civil War, the Civil War to the New Deal, and the New Deal to the present.

Specific eras and movements in literature from the nations of the British Isles: Wales, Scotland, the Republic of Ireland, and England. The sections include: Medieval literature, Renaissance literature, 17th-century literature, 18th-century literature, Romanticism, Victorian literature, Early 20th-century literature, and contemporary literature.

An overview of the major concepts in 20th- and 21st-century literary theory and an introduction to the major approaches in contemporary critical theory, including formalism, myth criticism, hermeneutics, deconstruction, feminism, psychoanalytic criticism, Marxism, post-colonial theory and the new historicism.

Studies in specialized areas or genres of writing. Sections may be offered in areas such as: technical writing, book editing, playwriting, writing for children or advanced studies in poetry or fiction.

Technical and digital communication workshop. Students will read and critique each other's work, study selected modern and contemporary digitally-born genres and investigate the technical writing process.

An in-depth study of the works of one or more significant authors with attention to the chronological development of the author's style, main themes and relationship to the literary tradition. Sections offered include such authors as Chaucer, Milton, Wordsworth and Coleridge, Faulkner, and Hemingway.

The English Capstone course endeavors to promote individual research, demonstrate creative/ scholarly productivity, and foster communal encouragement and accountability on a project that relies heavily on skills acquired in the students' previous years in the program. A culminating Capstone Project will be produced in consultation with the peer cohort and with one or more faculty members in the Department of English.


Concentrations

Literature

For those wishing to focus on the study of literature, the Literature track requires at least 12 credits in upper-division English courses in addition to the English core requirements. See catalog for details.

Writing

This concentration requires students to take five specialized courses in writing in addition to the English core courses. (Choose two from Poetry, Fiction and Nonfiction.)

Study of the theories of writing and rhetorical models. Extensive practice in writing.

Poetry workshop. Students will read and critique each other's work, study selected modern and contemporary poems and investigate the creative writing process.

Fiction workshop. Students will read and critique each other's work, study selected modern and contemporary short stories and investigate the creative writing process.

Nonfiction workshop. Students will read and critique each other's work, study selected modern and contemporary nonfiction genres, and investigate the creative writing process. Grade Mode: A.

Studies in specialized areas or genres of writing. Sections may be offered in areas such as: technical writing, book editing, playwriting, writing for children or advanced studies in poetry or fiction.

Technical and digital communication workshop. Students will read and critique each other's work, study selected modern and contemporary digitally-born genres and investigate the technical writing process.

Secondary Instruction

The program duration for this concentration is 138 credits.

Learning to read types of literature aloud in a manner that enhances and enriches the audience's understanding and appreciation of that literature. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Communication credit. Grade Mode: A.

Preparation for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET) for those pursuing the Secondary Instruction concentration. Recommended for Juniors in their Fall semester. Students must pass all parts of the CSET exam during the first semester of their Senior year in order to apply for student teaching during the Secondary Curriculum course (LEDU 435). Grade Mode: A.

This course examines the structure and function of the school, foundations of education, qualities required for teacher effectiveness, and contemporary issues in education. Successful completion of this course constitutes one of the requirements for admission to the Teacher Preparation Program. CBEST must be taken or basic skills requirement met during this course for acceptance to a credential program. Lecture/Lab Hours: A 25-hour fieldwork practicum component is required. Notes: Special approval required. Must submit Certificate of Clearance forms and valid negative TB test results. Credential candidates must pass this course with a grade of "B-" or higher. Grade Mode: A.

Application of psychological principles to the education process, role of the teacher and learner, human growth and development, learning styles, motivation, memory, transfer of learning, measurement and evaluation, research and experimentation in learning theory. Notes: Special approval required. Restricted to formal application and acceptance to the School of Education. Credential candidates must pass this course with a "B-" or higher. This course is designed to fulfill the University's writing competency requirement for credential students. Grade Mode: A.

Survey of the theories, programs, and instructional practices for English language development, including first and second language acquisition and individual factors affecting language acquisition. Strategies for the application of theory to classroom practice and instruction in content area literacy are emphasized. Principles of educational equity, diversity, and cultural and linguistic responsiveness are examined. Lecture/Lab Hours: A 10-hour fieldwork practicum component is required. Notes: Credential candidates must pass this course with a "B-" or higher. Valid Certificate of Clearance and negative TB test results required for fieldwork. CalTPA #1. Grade Mode: A.

Methods and materials for teaching reading through content areas in secondary schools; attention to reading techniques, testing, and individualization. Lecture/Lab Hours: A 35-hour fieldwork practicum component is required. Notes: Credential candidates must pass this course with a grade of "B-" or higher. Valid Certificate of Clearance and negative TB test results required for fieldwork. CalTPA #2. Grade Mode: A.

During interrelated activities in program coursework and fieldwork, Single Subject candidates relate the Common Core and the state-adopted K–12 academic content standards for candidates in their specific subject area to major concepts and principles in their discipline, including planning, organizing, and implementing effective instruction (Grades 7–12). Grade Mode: A.

A 60-hour fieldwork course to support Single Subject Credential candidates in application of teaching pedagogy. Candidates will design and teach a minimum of three lessons in local secondary schools. Notes: Credential candidates must pass this course with a grade of "B-" or higher. Valid Certificate of Clearance and negative TB test results required for fieldwork. Grade Mode: A.

The course emphasis is curriculum and instruction through the planning and teaching of a variety of developmentally and ability-appropriate instructional strategies for all learners, including Universal Design of Learning and Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTTS), differentiation, and assessment. Candidates will complete 60-hours of fieldwork. Candidates will design and teach several classroom lessons in local secondary schools.

Full-time laboratory experience in school classrooms under the direction of qualified supervising master teachers and University supervisors. University seminar required. Notes: Special approval required. Restricted to formal application. Must pass course with a grade of "B-" or higher. CalTPA #4. Candidates doing student teaching are limited to a maximum of 15 credits that semester with approval. Must register for LEDU 452 if completing student teaching in one semester. (See also SEED 514/515). Grade Mode: A.

See LEDU 450. Notes: Special approval required. Restricted to formal application. Must pass course with a grade of "B-" or higher. Grade Mode: A.
A survey of psychology as an empirical/behavioral science with a consideration of underlying philosophical bases in light of a Christian worldview. Topics to be surveyed include development, cognition, learning, motivation, physiology, socialization, personality and psychopathology. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Behavioral Science credit. Grade Mode: A.

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