Courses | Journalism and Integrated Media, B.A.

Summary

Below are some of the courses you’ll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising. For official program requirements see catalog for details.

Major Courses

Overview of recent history and current changes within American Journalism, basic principles of journalistic fact-finding and writing for print and Web formats. The course also examines connections of journalistic writing to photojournalism and visual media, and the ways news journalism and public relations complement each other in day-to-day practice. Through readings, discussion and projects, students explore their Christian world-view juxtaposed with perspectives evident in national and international media.

A course introducing students to fact-based storytelling that combines print and visuals in a Web format that meets the needs of students aiming at careers in the convergent media of journalism and public relations. Students learn convergence through readings, discussion, observation and project work. The course serves as a prerequisite to Convergent Media Production.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $50.

An examination of the basics of photography-editorial, graphic and technical. This introduction presumes no previous knowledge of photography. Students learn to capture images based on the above criteria with standard digital photographic equipment (SLR based). Students also learn basic skills to edit still photographs with the 'digital darkroom' and prepare them for publications and Web media.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $75.

Practical study and experience in successful strategies for making the step from academia to journalism and public relations careers. Students interact with working professionals through guest lectures, media tours and mock job interviews, examining the maturity of their gifts and skills and whether they have the readiness needed for effective participation in journalism, public relations, or other media environments--whether as an intern or a new employee. The course also helps students examine steps needed to prepare for graduate school, law school, and church or missions-related ministry as options naturally following their journalism preparation.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Portfolio course in which students produce professional-level work in one of the following campus media: newspaper, magazine, public relations, television, radio or Web/convergent media. Work in the practicum is designed as a springboard to competitive application for internships and career-entry in media and media-related ministry. Students are not allowed to take Practicum credits simultaneously (in one semester). Notes: May be taken twice for credit.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 107; and JOUR 111 or JOUR 220 or JOUR 231 or JOUR 235 or JOUR 236 as pertinent to the practicum.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $30.

Deadline production for the Web using news, features and sports reporting approaches. Students learn techniques for effectively combining writing, still photos, video clips, audio files, and interactive media elements to produce contextual coverage of breaking events and trends affecting the Biola campus and/or the surrounding region. Students rotate responsibilities for various pieces of the convergent product.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 107.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

Study of theoretical approaches to the First Amendment as well as specific areas of concern to professional journalists such as defamation, privacy, fair trial, obscenity, copyright, shield laws, sunshine laws, etc. Exploration of applied professional ethics and contemporary professional issues of ethics for journalists.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A portfolio-driven, guided learning experience beyond the university classroom via working in a media-related organization. This course will test students' interest, aptitude and stamina for work within their chosen area of journalism, public relations or media-related ministry. This course is aimed at providing students with a finished portfolio of work suitable for entry to a media career or media-related ministry. Includes on-campus sessions designed to strengthen and expand professional skills. Notes: Sixty hours of internship are required for each academic credit. A total of 3 credits of internship are required for the major. It is strongly recommended that students take this course 1 credit at a time.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Junior Class, or Senior Class; and must be Undergraduate Level.

A capstone course for journalism majors organized in a seminar style in which students review the philosophies of formative thinkers behind American journalism (print, broadcast and Internet), and examine the philosophy of a journalist whom they'll shadow. The course culminates in each student's examination of his or her own philosophy of journalism and sense of calling as a believer practicing journalism or public relations or as an influence in the marketplace of public opinion.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A course guiding students in preparation, management and presentation/defense of three-fold competency in the senior portfolio required for graduation in the major. The portfolio measures learning in pre-professional, leadership-based, and biblical integration outcomes. Students are advised to take this course in the semester prior to their intended semester of graduation.


Concentrations

Broadcast

Familiarizes students with and challenges them in a variety of forms of public relations writing. Vehicles include internal and external media, print, electronic and audiovisual. Emphases include research, audience analysis, message design, and selection of communication channels.
Prerequisites: JOUR 111 (concurrent registration permitted).
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A laboratory-oriented course in public affairs reporting that puts emphasis on back-grounding, interviewing, topic newsgathering and basic familiarity with use of public records and the paper trail for deadlines, stories in print visual and/or broadcast news.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 120.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

A course in broadcast journalism in which students learn the craft of shooting TV news and informational video. They also study the process of video storytelling and how to create a compelling news package. Course includes shooting stand-ups, interview, b-roll and voice-overs, with an emphasis on editing and production.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $80.

Students learn basic techniques of broadcast news-writing, video shooting, editing and production. Classes consist of lecture/discussion and guidance in project work for telling visual and/or audio stories adapted to traditional broadcast settings as well as Web audiences.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 107 may be taken concurrently.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $25.

Practical study and experience in successful strategies for covering youth, varsity and professional sports for deadline news media (print, broadcast and Web). The course will emphasize techniques for interviewing, reporting and writing about sports for print and online media, but will include elements applicable to video and audio components of a convergent approach to sports journalism. Ethics of sports journalism practice from a Christian world-view are applied to the media marketplace through discussion and project-driven experience. Notes: JOUR 220, JOUR 231, and JOUR 235 are recommended.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $10.

Laboratory, lecture and discussion course in advanced principles of identifying news, its sources and the connection of issues with trends. Course emphasizes in-depth (documentary-style) interviewing, variable deadline writing, introductory use of and analysis of online and retrievable databases, and other online resources for journalism and public relations.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

Students learn the nuts and bolts for writing and producing a television newscast. The course observes life behind-the-scenes in a television newsroom. Students study the format for writing for television news, as well as how to stack a show, assign packages and stories, and how to produce in breaking news situations. Students also study the writing format for television news, as well as how to properly write a television news package.

Students learn principles and practical application of television directing and the aspects of production that determine aesthetic quality. Techniques and concepts of video field reporting, production and video editing are introduced. Lecture, discussion, and projects give particular emphasis to developing critical and analytic abilities, and realizing practical applications of media ethics and aesthetics.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $80.

Students acquire the basic skills necessary to work as a television news anchor and reporter. Study of delivery topics including: breathing techniques, voice pitch, how to read the teleprompter, on-air appearance and one of the most important skills necessary as a broadcast journalist, how to deliver a live report. Class projects include mandatory appearances on Biola's EagleVision newscasts, as both an anchor and reporter. May include a visit to a local television news studio.
Prerequisites: JOUR 230 or JOUR 236.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $10.

Takes students to the highest levels of identification of news trends and the roots of news events by means of advanced database investigation, use of extensive public documents and advanced forms of paper trail pursuit to report on people, businesses, organizations and institutions. The course approaches in-depth investigation with a Christian worldview that sees truth-telling as a Biblical prophetic mandate balancing mercy and justice.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

A portfolio-driven, guided learning experience beyond the university classroom via working in a media-related organization. This course will test students' interest, aptitude and stamina for work within their chosen area of journalism, public relations or media-related ministry. This course is aimed at providing students with a finished portfolio of work suitable for entry to a media career or media-related ministry. Includes on-campus sessions designed to strengthen and expand professional skills. Notes: Sixty hours of internship are required for each academic credit. A total of 3 credits of internship are required for the major. It is strongly recommended that students take this course 1 credit at a time.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Junior Class, or Senior Class; and must be Undergraduate Level.

Examination of strategies and practice of reviewing the creative arts such as photography, dance, music, videos, film, books, architecture and drama with limited attention to major modern reviewers and critics. Required participation in field trips to various artistic presentations and shows serves as a basis for class discussions.

A rotating variety of topics and production experiences often employing special guests from within Journalism or Public Relations. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, Documentary Reporting, Political Journalism, PR Fund Raising, Event Planning, Cross-cultural journalism, advanced multimedia, or advanced photojournalism. Notes: May be taken multiple times for a maximum of 6 credits.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 107; JOUR 111 or JOUR 231 or JOUR 236 as pertinent to the seminar topic.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: May involve lab fees.

Individual research in an area of Journalism or Public Relations determined in consultation with the instructor. Notes: Special approval required. May be taken for a total of 6 credits.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Visual Media

An introduction to drawing, perspective, line, shape, value texture and composition. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Fine Arts credit.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $60.

An introduction to the terms, tools and techniques of visual computing for artists using the Macintosh platform. This course is designed to train students with basic computer skills and programs such as Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator and to insure digital literacy.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $100.

A foundational course devoted to examining, exploring, and applying two-dimensional design concepts, including color theory and composition. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Fine Arts credit.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $90.

A survey of contemporary art photography, introducing the practices of darkroom, digital, black and white, and color photography, with an emphasis on technical and conceptual aspects. Notes: Highly recommended that students own or have access to both 35mm film and digital SLR cameras. Approved for Core Curriculum Fine Arts credit.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $100.

Students develop methods of visual communication that draw on the cumulative experience of 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D coursework. Through the use of digital/analog tools and readings related to the current discourse, students explore the process of design and communication.
Prerequisites: ARTS 112.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $100.

A study of art produced since World War II, focusing on current movements within the international art community.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $30.

A studio exploration of color photography using digital and film techniques. Emphasis placed on color theory, contemporary issues, and the technical skills of artificial lighting and professional digital printing workflow. Notes: Highly recommended that students own or have access to digital SLR camera.
Prerequisites: ARTS 221.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $100.

A study of the design and use of letter forms and their direct application to the typographic ideas of contrast, hierarchy, and grids. Students build skills for the art of typesetting and typographic layout, and for expressive typography and conceptual thinking.
Prerequisites: ARTS 110.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $100.

A critical exploration of current graphic design forms emphasizing core design competencies including color theory, image-text integration and problem solving. A variety of software applications such as Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign are used in investigating mass media and examining particular strategies, imagery and delivery.
Prerequisites: ARTS 423.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $100.

Focused exploration of black and white photography covering its creative, technical and historical aspects. Emphasis is placed on darkroom techniques, some advanced digital black and white also explored. Notes: Highly recommended that students own a 35mm SLR camera.
Prerequisites: ARTS 221.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $100.

Through an introduction to the building blocks of visual storytelling, students will learn to use film grammar to tell their stories effectively. Special emphasis will be given to lighting, color, shape, line, and space.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Cinema and Media Arts (CNMA); and Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $60.

A laboratory-oriented course in public affairs reporting that puts emphasis on back-grounding, interviewing, topic newsgathering and basic familiarity with use of public records and the paper trail for deadlines, stories in print visual and/or broadcast news.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 120.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

A course in broadcast journalism in which students learn the craft of shooting TV news and informational video. They also study the process of video storytelling and how to create a compelling news package. Course includes shooting stand-ups, interview, b-roll and voice-overs, with an emphasis on editing and production.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $80.

Students learn basic techniques of broadcast news-writing, video shooting, editing and production. Classes consist of lecture/discussion and guidance in project work for telling visual and/or audio stories adapted to traditional broadcast settings as well as Web audiences.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 107 may be taken concurrently.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $25.

A course introducing students to digital approaches to publishing, including basic principles of design and typography, hands-on practice with leading industry software and the ultimate production of publication material. The adobe suite of products (Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, and Dreamweaver) is used. Provides students with the opportunity to develop the use of electronic procedures to produce and edit publications and Web sites. Students create, format, illustrate and design print material and Web products. The course prepares students to produce such materials as newsletters, flyers, brochures, publication spreads and advertising materials. This is an entry-level course, assuming students have little or no previous experience with the Adobe suite of products.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

Laboratory, lecture and discussion course in advanced principles of identifying news, its sources and the connection of issues with trends. Course emphasizes in-depth (documentary-style) interviewing, variable deadline writing, introductory use of and analysis of online and retrievable databases, and other online resources for journalism and public relations.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

Explores reporting and documentation through the visual medium of still images. Students photograph assignments under working press conditions and advance their skills using the SLR camera.
Prerequisites: JOUR 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $80.

Examines the trends in design as they impact newspapers, magazines, broadcast and promotional material in applicable print, online and mobile form. It is expected that students have a basic ability with the Adobe Suite of products. Emphasis is on the design of cohesive multi-page (print or digital) publications, sites and/or apps. Examines editorial operations, production procedures, and the role of the art/design director. In the class' workshop setting, students are familiarized not only with theoretical ideas but also with practical considerations of design.
Prerequisites: JOUR 249.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $35.

Advertising principles and techniques. The study of effective and ineffective forms of advertising. Applications linked to public relations, media events, marketing, and communication encounters.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $25.

A portfolio-driven, guided learning experience beyond the university classroom via working in a media-related organization. This course will test students' interest, aptitude and stamina for work within their chosen area of journalism, public relations or media-related ministry. This course is aimed at providing students with a finished portfolio of work suitable for entry to a media career or media-related ministry. Includes on-campus sessions designed to strengthen and expand professional skills. Notes: Sixty hours of internship are required for each academic credit. A total of 3 credits of internship are required for the major. It is strongly recommended that students take this course 1 credit at a time.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Junior Class, or Senior Class; and must be Undergraduate Level.

Continues the exploration of reporting and interpreting the news through photos, photo documentaries, and photo analysis. Advanced techniques of visual reporting and interpreting news are explored. Working under deadline continues to be a part of the advanced course. Introduces the use of lighting techniques, including operation of portable and studio strobes.
Prerequisites: JOUR 347.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $80.

A rotating variety of topics and production experiences often employing special guests from within Journalism or Public Relations. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, Documentary Reporting, Political Journalism, PR Fund Raising, Event Planning, Cross-cultural journalism, advanced multimedia, or advanced photojournalism. Notes: May be taken multiple times for a maximum of 6 credits.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 107; JOUR 111 or JOUR 231 or JOUR 236 as pertinent to the seminar topic.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: May involve lab fees.

Individual research in an area of Journalism or Public Relations determined in consultation with the instructor. Notes: Special approval required. May be taken for a total of 6 credits.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Cross-Cultural Media

Provides a historical and sociological examination of the role of religion, in particular Christianity in its various forms, in the culture, history, and faith of people speaking the target language. Attention will be given to expressions of faith, religious practices, and the role of faith in the life of people and society. This course will be taught as a travel practicum. There is a substantial service learning component.

Provides a historical and sociological examination of the role or religion, in particular Christianity in its various forms, in the culture, history, and faith of people speaking the target language. Attention will be given to expressions of faith, religious practices, and the role of faith in the life of people and society. This course will be taught as a travel practicum. There is a substantial service learning component.

This Spanish language immersion course is a community-based, experiential learning opportunity in Spanish which will consist of Spanish in a classroom setting focusing on the exploration of local varieties of Spanish and Latino culture. Students are required to live in a Christian host family and participate in mandatory excursions and service learning in the target language during afternoon, evening, and weekend hours. The course will normally be offered during interterm and summer sessions.

This is an introductory course to the field of Hispanic linguistics which explores basic terminologies, methods and theories associated with the field. The course will establish a foundation for future field work and introduce students to the practical application of linguistic knowledge. This course will be a prerequisite to advanced linguistics courses within the department.

Exploration of foundational issues related to international and intercultural ministry, including foundational models of global Christian witness, mission formation, contextualization, and an overview of various global realities (poverty; international development; Islam; unreached peoples; urbanization; globalization; and peace, security and conflict) from a Biblical perspective. Career tracks in intercultural and global service are explored.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Exploration of the cross-cultural transition process, focusing on healthy adjustment as a sojourner in a new culture. Attention given to understanding and applying grace to oneself and others, discerning cultural values, conflict styles, social stratification and celebration.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A study of specific cultural areas with an emphasis on customs, social structures, religion, arts, and history. Areas of specialty may include:

An introductory study of the city as the center of religion, economics, politics and social life for all major cultures. Focuses on forming a professional response for ministry in the city.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Principles and processes of communicating from one culture to another. Focus on different perceptions, ways of thinking, values, non-verbal expression, language expression and subgroups within a culture as they relate to the media and the message. Notes: See also COMM 472.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

The use of social science research techniques to learn about the people, needs and opportunities for living, working, and serving in the city. Special attention is given to researching people groups and the adaptations they make to urban contexts. Notes: Course is usually offered in Los Angeles in the Fall semester and frequently in New York City as a Summer Study Tour. See Program Director for details.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Overview of recent history and current changes within American Journalism, basic principles of journalistic fact-finding and writing for print and Web formats. The course also examines connections of journalistic writing to photojournalism and visual media, and the ways news journalism and public relations complement each other in day-to-day practice. Through readings, discussion and projects, students explore their Christian world-view juxtaposed with perspectives evident in national and international media.

A course introducing students to fact-based storytelling that combines print and visuals in a Web format that meets the needs of students aiming at careers in the convergent media of journalism and public relations. Students learn convergence through readings, discussion, observation and project work. The course serves as a prerequisite to Convergent Media Production.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $50.

An examination of the basics of photography-editorial, graphic and technical. This introduction presumes no previous knowledge of photography. Students learn to capture images based on the above criteria with standard digital photographic equipment (SLR based). Students also learn basic skills to edit still photographs with the 'digital darkroom' and prepare them for publications and Web media.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $75.

A laboratory-oriented course in public affairs reporting that puts emphasis on back-grounding, interviewing, topic newsgathering and basic familiarity with use of public records and the paper trail for deadlines, stories in print visual and/or broadcast news.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 120.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

Students learn basic techniques of broadcast news-writing, video shooting, editing and production. Classes consist of lecture/discussion and guidance in project work for telling visual and/or audio stories adapted to traditional broadcast settings as well as Web audiences.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 107 may be taken concurrently.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $25.

A course introducing students to digital approaches to publishing, including basic principles of design and typography, hands-on practice with leading industry software and the ultimate production of publication material. The adobe suite of products (Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, and Dreamweaver) is used. Provides students with the opportunity to develop the use of electronic procedures to produce and edit publications and Web sites. Students create, format, illustrate and design print material and Web products. The course prepares students to produce such materials as newsletters, flyers, brochures, publication spreads and advertising materials. This is an entry-level course, assuming students have little or no previous experience with the Adobe suite of products.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

Practical study and experience in successful strategies for making the step from academia to journalism and public relations careers. Students interact with working professionals through guest lectures, media tours and mock job interviews, examining the maturity of their gifts and skills and whether they have the readiness needed for effective participation in journalism, public relations, or other media environments--whether as an intern or a new employee. The course also helps students examine steps needed to prepare for graduate school, law school, and church or missions-related ministry as options naturally following their journalism preparation.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Laboratory, lecture and discussion course in advanced principles of identifying news, its sources and the connection of issues with trends. Course emphasizes in-depth (documentary-style) interviewing, variable deadline writing, introductory use of and analysis of online and retrievable databases, and other online resources for journalism and public relations.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

Explores reporting and documentation through the visual medium of still images. Students photograph assignments under working press conditions and advance their skills using the SLR camera.
Prerequisites: JOUR 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $80.

A travel course taking students to an area outside Southern California where they will investigate a problem or trend, illustrate and explain the political or socio-cultural background, current struggles or challenges and possible solutions for change. Involves use of writing and/or visuals adaptable to the Web in a final project that demonstrates students' grasp of other cultures and the deeper issues behind trends or events. The course will periodically involve an international media project partnered with a missions organization or media outlet in another country.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 107.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A course focusing on broadcast and/or print or Web news from an international perspective. Students follow news stories with international significance, comparing story content, coverage and decision-making with the national media in the United States. Guest speakers include experts from the international news media.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Study of theoretical approaches to the First Amendment as well as specific areas of concern to professional journalists such as defamation, privacy, fair trial, obscenity, copyright, shield laws, sunshine laws, etc. Exploration of applied professional ethics and contemporary professional issues of ethics for journalists.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A portfolio-driven, guided learning experience beyond the university classroom via working in a media-related organization. This course will test students' interest, aptitude and stamina for work within their chosen area of journalism, public relations or media-related ministry. This course is aimed at providing students with a finished portfolio of work suitable for entry to a media career or media-related ministry. Includes on-campus sessions designed to strengthen and expand professional skills. Notes: Sixty hours of internship are required for each academic credit. A total of 3 credits of internship are required for the major. It is strongly recommended that students take this course 1 credit at a time.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Junior Class, or Senior Class; and must be Undergraduate Level.

Students in this mastery-level course will explore in-depth a topic using a team approach that moves their inquiry from a core idea into a multi-part exploration that, by the end of the semester, becomes a finished book published by the department through on-demand technology. Book topics will vary, but urban and cross-cultural themes will be emphasized, pointing towards the needs and solutions being sought to help the marginalized and alienated within and around the American evangelical church and/or internationally. Projects will include reporting through written and visual form, and as needed, video storytelling and web development that enhances audience understanding of the book's topic.

A course guiding students in preparation, management and presentation/defense of three-fold competency in the senior portfolio required for graduation in the major. The portfolio measures learning in pre-professional, leadership-based, and biblical integration outcomes. Students are advised to take this course in the semester prior to their intended semester of graduation.

A continuation of Intermediate-level French, this course will cover typical aspects of French daily life with special emphasis on idioms, useful phrases and conversational patterns. Topics deal with true to life situations and practical aspects of the language.

Provides intensive practice and instruction in French conversation at the high-intermediate level. It will help students develop a strong command of grammar structures, build their lexical repertoire, as well as orient them to the uses of formal and informal uses of French. Students will develop critical thinking skills and will be given the tools for approaching, and understanding a wide variety of texts, as well as develop strategies for expressing themselves with fluency and spontaneity in conversation. Students will also be guided through the writing process in order to guide them to produce well-structured texts in French.

This course will develop the students' command of the linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competencies of the language. At this level, learners will be able to understand without difficulty almost everything heard or read. Learners will be able to express themselves in a fluent, precise and spontaneous way, and differentiate various connotations and levels of meaning in complex texts. Learners will produce well structured written texts on a wide variety of topics.

Intermediate grammar, listening, speaking, writing, reading. Course develops communication in various contexts with increasing proficiency. Learners will acquire greater command over basic and intermediate level structures. They will be equipped to use the linguistics sociolinguistic and pragmatic competencies in broader domains. At this level, the learner can perform the activities of the language perception (e.g., can understand the main ideas of complex texts on various topics, including semi-specialized language), of production (e.g., can express oneself clearly and in detail on a wide range of topics), in interaction (e.g., can maintain a conversation and interact with a certain degree of fluency and spontaneity).

This course will build upon and further develop the informal knowledge of Spanish that heritage learners bring to the classroom—usually from family and neighborhood exposure to the language—and cultivate formal speaking, reading, and writing abilities.

The learner will acquire a more solid command of linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competencies; she/he will develop a stronger command of grammar structures, broader lexical repertoire, good command of idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms. The learner will be trained to activate the strategies she/he needs in order to understand a wide range of complex and longer texts, express him/herself with fluency and spontaneity that makes conversation possible with a native speaker. Produces well structured text, makes good use of connectors and cohesive words.

This course seeks to broaden the informal knowledge of Spanish that heritage learners bring to the classroom and focuses primarily on the development of formal speaking, reading, and writing abilities across a variety of topics and genders.

This course seeks to broaden the informal knowledge of Spanish that heritage learners bring to the classroom and focuses primarily on the development of formal speaking, reading, and writing abilities across a variety of topics and genres.

Learners will develop a much stronger command of the linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competencies of the language. At this level, learners will be able to understand without difficulty almost everything heard or read. Learners can express themselves in a fluent, precise and spontaneous way, and differentiate various connotations and levels of meaning in complex texts. Learners will produce well structured written texts on a wide variety of topics.

This course will focus on the aspects of the Spanish language that are specific to the communications professions, as well as the social and cultural issues that one might encounter when working within Hispanic communities, local and global. Through experiential learning, readings, discussions and fieldwork, students will develop socio-cultural understanding and communicative competence in the target language.

Writing and Publishing

An examination of the basics of photography-editorial, graphic and technical. This introduction presumes no previous knowledge of photography. Students learn to capture images based on the above criteria with standard digital photographic equipment (SLR based). Students also learn basic skills to edit still photographs with the 'digital darkroom' and prepare them for publications and Web media.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $75.

Familiarizes students with and challenges them in a variety of forms of public relations writing. Vehicles include internal and external media, print, electronic and audiovisual. Emphases include research, audience analysis, message design, and selection of communication channels.
Prerequisites: JOUR 111 (concurrent registration permitted).
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A laboratory-oriented course in public affairs reporting that puts emphasis on back-grounding, interviewing, topic newsgathering and basic familiarity with use of public records and the paper trail for deadlines, stories in print visual and/or broadcast news.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 120.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

Students learn basic techniques of broadcast news-writing, video shooting, editing and production. Classes consist of lecture/discussion and guidance in project work for telling visual and/or audio stories adapted to traditional broadcast settings as well as Web audiences.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 107 may be taken concurrently.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $25.

A course introducing students to digital approaches to publishing, including basic principles of design and typography, hands-on practice with leading industry software and the ultimate production of publication material. The adobe suite of products (Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, and Dreamweaver) is used. Provides students with the opportunity to develop the use of electronic procedures to produce and edit publications and Web sites. Students create, format, illustrate and design print material and Web products. The course prepares students to produce such materials as newsletters, flyers, brochures, publication spreads and advertising materials. This is an entry-level course, assuming students have little or no previous experience with the Adobe suite of products.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

Practical study and experience in successful strategies for covering youth, varsity and professional sports for deadline news media (print, broadcast and Web). The course will emphasize techniques for interviewing, reporting and writing about sports for print and online media, but will include elements applicable to video and audio components of a convergent approach to sports journalism. Ethics of sports journalism practice from a Christian world-view are applied to the media marketplace through discussion and project-driven experience. Notes: JOUR 220, JOUR 231, and JOUR 235 are recommended.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $10.

Laboratory, lecture and discussion course in advanced principles of identifying news, its sources and the connection of issues with trends. Course emphasizes in-depth (documentary-style) interviewing, variable deadline writing, introductory use of and analysis of online and retrievable databases, and other online resources for journalism and public relations.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

Exploration of aesthetics and design with emphasis on copy editing and marking skills necessary for quality presentation of material in newspapers, magazines, newsletters and other journalistic venues. Extensive practice of copy editing with attention to style, grammar, punctuation, writing headlines, cutlines, selection of type, use of color and art.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $50.

Principles of writing for targeted audiences that win readers and editors at niche and mainstream magazines. Students move articles from inception to querying through the revision processes of medium and long-form features and in-depth article writing. Course includes elements of business self-management, budgeting and copyright guidelines.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Explores reporting and documentation through the visual medium of still images. Students photograph assignments under working press conditions and advance their skills using the SLR camera.
Prerequisites: JOUR 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $80.

Examines the trends in design as they impact newspapers, magazines, broadcast and promotional material in applicable print, online and mobile form. It is expected that students have a basic ability with the Adobe Suite of products. Emphasis is on the design of cohesive multi-page (print or digital) publications, sites and/or apps. Examines editorial operations, production procedures, and the role of the art/design director. In the class' workshop setting, students are familiarized not only with theoretical ideas but also with practical considerations of design.
Prerequisites: JOUR 249.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $35.

Through written projects and discussion, this course helps students see the bridge between the best of American literature and the ongoing success of literary non-fiction journalism for such magazines as the New Yorker and Atlantic Monthly. By means of regular instruction and guest speakers, students learn to adapt theme, characters, plot and the pacing of narrative needed to develop stories that are both factual and dramatic. Students read and critique not only professionals' work, but also their own. May include study of the bridge between literary journalism and script-writing.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $25.

Practical study and experience in successful strategies for agencies, organizations, businesses, ministries and mission organizations as they pursue balanced media coverage and respond to requests for interviews, data or other questions aimed at publication or broadcast on various deadlines. Ethics of media relations practice from a Christian world-view are applied to the media marketplace through discussion and project-driven experience.

Advertising principles and techniques. The study of effective and ineffective forms of advertising. Applications linked to public relations, media events, marketing, and communication encounters.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $25.

Takes students to the highest levels of identification of news trends and the roots of news events by means of advanced database investigation, use of extensive public documents and advanced forms of paper trail pursuit to report on people, businesses, organizations and institutions. The course approaches in-depth investigation with a Christian worldview that sees truth-telling as a Biblical prophetic mandate balancing mercy and justice.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $20.

A portfolio-driven, guided learning experience beyond the university classroom via working in a media-related organization. This course will test students' interest, aptitude and stamina for work within their chosen area of journalism, public relations or media-related ministry. This course is aimed at providing students with a finished portfolio of work suitable for entry to a media career or media-related ministry. Includes on-campus sessions designed to strengthen and expand professional skills. Notes: Sixty hours of internship are required for each academic credit. A total of 3 credits of internship are required for the major. It is strongly recommended that students take this course 1 credit at a time.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Junior Class, or Senior Class; and must be Undergraduate Level.

A lecture, discussion and writing course in the power of well-researched argumentation through opinion writing in both print and online formats. Students analyze editorials, columns, news analyses, reviews, and editorial cartoons and illustrations as these appear in print and online. The course begins with the historical basis and ethics underlying opinion journalism, tracing its development to the current day and the unique place of the opinion page and opinion in web sites for newspapers, magazines, and online publications in various communities of readers in the United States and in other countries.

Examination of strategies and practice of reviewing the creative arts such as photography, dance, music, videos, film, books, architecture and drama with limited attention to major modern reviewers and critics. Required participation in field trips to various artistic presentations and shows serves as a basis for class discussions.

Continues the exploration of reporting and interpreting the news through photos, photo documentaries, and photo analysis. Advanced techniques of visual reporting and interpreting news are explored. Working under deadline continues to be a part of the advanced course. Introduces the use of lighting techniques, including operation of portable and studio strobes.
Prerequisites: JOUR 347.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: $80.

A rotating variety of topics and production experiences often employing special guests from within Journalism or Public Relations. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, Documentary Reporting, Political Journalism, PR Fund Raising, Event Planning, Cross-cultural journalism, advanced multimedia, or advanced photojournalism. Notes: May be taken multiple times for a maximum of 6 credits.
Prerequisites: JOUR 105, JOUR 107; JOUR 111 or JOUR 231 or JOUR 236 as pertinent to the seminar topic.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.
Fees: May involve lab fees.

Individual research in an area of Journalism or Public Relations determined in consultation with the instructor. Notes: Special approval required. May be taken for a total of 6 credits.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Students in this mastery-level course will explore in-depth a topic using a team approach that moves their inquiry from a core idea into a multi-part exploration that, by the end of the semester, becomes a finished book published by the department through on-demand technology. Book topics will vary, but urban and cross-cultural themes will be emphasized, pointing towards the needs and solutions being sought to help the marginalized and alienated within and around the American evangelical church and/or internationally. Projects will include reporting through written and visual form, and as needed, video storytelling and web development that enhances audience understanding of the book's topic.

A culmination of the visual student's academic career. This course is the laboratory where visual students transition from student to master of their craft, bringing together journalism fundamentals, approaches to storytelling, and technology and techniques necessary to produce visual material in various forms. Students bring their mastered understanding of craft together with their developed ability to think critically concerning their faith and the world around them, to ultimately produce intensive final projects of their choosing. Students will consider business practices as they develop proposals, researching their areas of focus and considering experts and best practices for their final projects.
Prerequisites: JOUR 348 or JOUR 466.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.