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Latest Biola Blog Articles

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joe Hellerman — 

    Allow me to introduce you to Brett McCracken. Brett is a Talbot student and Biola employee whom God is using in some very strategic ways to represent Jesus and his people at the national level. I became acquainted with Brett through my oversight of the Good Book Blog. I am thankful and proud that this humble and gifted young man is part of the Biola/Talbot community, and I think that you will be, too, after you read the following interview.

  • Biola Magazine

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    One of the best parts of my job is getting to learn about your job. Really. It’s inspiring to see the many ways that God is using Biola graduates...

  • Biola Magazine

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    This past academic year I was on a flight from Chicago to New York, seated in 29D. As I boarded the plane, I noticed a handful of Orthodox Jewish...

  • Biola Magazine

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    Biola University has again been named one of America’s best colleges, earning high marks this fall on several annual college-ranking lists. In...

  • Biola Magazine

    A Spate of the Arts

    Biola Launches Center for Christianity, Culture and the Arts

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    On Sept. 20, Biola celebrated the official launch of its new Center for Christianity, Culture and the Arts (CCCA), with the unveiling of the brand...

  • Biola Magazine

    Talbot Prayer Chapel Impresses Design Community

    Awards, acclaim pour in for Biola's unique sacred space

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    Hidden away in the lower level of the newest building on Biola’s campus, Talbot East, is a room you have to know you are looking for. But once you...

  • Biola Magazine

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    For the second year in a row, Biola University’s supporters made history by setting records for total giving in a single fiscal year. In the 2012–...

  • Biola Magazine

    The Forgotten Founder

    Biola’s first dean sold millions of books, evangelized around the world and was named “the father of Zionism” by a Supreme Court justice. Today, he's nearly vanished from school history. Here's why William E. Blackstone should be remembered.

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    In 1936, my grandfather Paul W. Rood, who was Biola’s president in the midst of a deep national depression, chose to celebrate Biola’s heritage...

  • Biola Magazine

    Good Advice

    Twenty-one alumni and professors offer practical wisdom from their areas of expertise

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    How to Tell a Great Story I write books for a living — sometimes my own, sometimes in collaboration with high-profile public figures. The genre I...

  • Biola Magazine

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    It’s one of the most life-altering war wounds that a service member can experience, even though it doesn’t leave a scratch on the body:...

  • Biola Magazine

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    “Even though they were crucified, stoned, stabbed, dragged, skinned and burned, every last apostle of Jesus proclaimed his resurrection until his...

  • Biola Magazine

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    There is a live question among Christians regarding the place of doubt in the life of faith. Karl Barth identifies two forms of Christian doubt:...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Octavio Esqueda — 

    El 31 de octubre de 1517 Martín Lutero clavó en las puertas de la catedral de Wittenberg en Alemania 95 tesis en las que criticaba abiertamente las ventas de indulgencias de la iglesia católica romana. Lutero inicialmente no tenía la intención de romper con la iglesia romana sino enfatizar la supremacía del evangelio basada en su simplicidad y a la vez en su gran profundidad. El evangelio o las buenas noticias de la salvación en Cristo es el fundamento esencial de la fe cristiana y desgraciadamente se había pervertido convirtiéndose en una práctica totalmente ajena a su esencia. De manera que, las indulgencias eran una distorsión absoluta del evangelio y, por lo tanto, dignas de ser repudiadas con severidad. Como resultado de esta acción, Lutero inició el movimiento conocido como la Reforma Protestante y cada 31 de octubre se conmemora como el Día de la Reforma.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Charlie Trimm — 

    God’s role as a divine warrior is most likely one of his more neglected characteristics. Some today have gone so far as to reject any talk today about God being a divine warrior, viewing it as tired metaphor that should be retired. But most Christians have simply stopped thinking of God as one who fights. Not only does it not seem to mesh well with the picture of the peaceful Jesus but it is also out of step with most of contemporary culture. In spite of these concerns, looking at the martial actions of YHWH in the Old Testament (YHWH is a transliteration of God’s name in Hebrew) can help us understand better the God that we serve.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Kenneth Way — 

    I recently completed a manuscript on the book of Judges for Baker’s Teach the Text Commentary Series. It took me about three and a half years to write the short text, and I want to share just a few highlights from what I learned during my study.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joe Hellerman — 

    Literally. This morning I was jogging on the beach and came across four people: (1) a minister, (2) photographer, (3) a young man in a tux, and (4) a young lady in a wedding dress. I think the ceremony had just ended, because they were signing the marriage license as I ran by. What was sad was that there was not another person in sight.

  • The Good Book Blog

    The Good Book Blog — 

    Ed Curtis, professor of biblical and theological studies at Talbot, just released the new book, Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs (Teach the Text Commentary Series). He kindly took some time to answer a few questions about the book.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Thaddeus Williams — 

    I recently watched a disturbing video. A camera caught the head of a certain political organization; we’ll call him Lucius, attempting to convince a packed auditorium about the reality of moral law. Specifically, Lucius appealed to a real moral law above and beyond culture to argue against a right to homosexual marriage. What struck me most was less of what he said and more how he said it. Lucius taunted the crowd relentlessly, hurling insults like hand grenades. People often argue against moral reality by appealing to moral reality (e.g., there can’t be absolutes because look at out how absolutely wrong the crusades and inquisitions were!). But there is an equal and opposite inconsistency, namely, arguing for moral reality while breaking the very morality we are defending (e.g., real morals like ‘love your neighbor’ exist, you ignoramus!). In other words, Lucius’ problem was that he did not argue his worldview as if his worldview were actually true. No matter what he said, the way in which he said it made it seem like morals like love and respect were not to be taken seriously after all. The medium refuted the message.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Darian Lockett — 

    After thirty-five years of service, James Adamson’s NICNT commentary on the Epistle of James has received a much-needed update by Scot McKnight. McKnight’s contribution to the series significantly expands on its predecessor volume—being more than twice its size—which is due, in part, to the mounting scholarship on James appearing since its 1976 publication date.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Ben Shin — 

    Being a retreat speaker can be an enjoyable time but can also be a challenging time. The difference maker for which outcome occurs is largely dependent on the host for the speaker. Over the years, as both a speaker and also as a host, I’ve seen some excellent treatment of speakers and also some situations that could use a lot of improvement. This will be a 2 part series of blogs in which I hope to highlight some ways to invite and host a guest speaker in which he would feel very well taken care of throughout the whole process. In this first part of the series, I will focus on how to invite a guest speaker to a retreat.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Nell Sunukjian — 

    A few years ago women students at Talbot were invited to a luncheon to listen to a couple of faculty women talk about Wisdom Calls. A student coordinator, Angela Song, sent me these questions in advance and here are the answers I jotted down.

  • The Good Book Blog

    David Talley — 

    This is a review of book that you might find helpful: Crazy Busy by Kevin DeYoung.

  • The Good Book Blog

    The Good Book Blog — 

    Robert Saucy, distinguished professor of systematic theology at Talbot, just released the new book, Minding the Heart: The Way of Spiritual Transformation. He kindly took some time to answer a few questions about the book.

  • Business. Ministry. Life.

    Nick Sherwin — 

    In part one of this blog topic, I took a critical look at two of the five specific categories of financial ratios required in the undergraduate...

  • The Good Book Blog

    John McKinley — 

    “Flee immorality. Every other sin that a man commits is outside the body, but the immoral man sins against his own body” (1 Cor 6:18 NASB). Why is sexual sin singled out as uniquely damaging to the body in a way that other physical actions are not? Substance abuse, gluttony, cutting—these are all harmful acts to the body, but they do not do what sexual misconduct does, according to Paul. Typical responses from students to explain this exception are that sex involves the whole person, or maybe because it involves someone else. The same could be said for illegal drug use, so there must be something more.