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Latest Biola Blog Articles

  • The Good Book Blog

    Ben Shin — 

    Whether you know it or not, pastors in the church work very hard. They do a lot of things publicly like preaching, teaching, visitation, and leading; but they also do quite a bit behind the scenes like counseling, studying, planning, and praying. Unfortunately, for many pastors, it has become a thankless job. For this reason alone, it would be important for you to celebrate this upcoming October because it is Clergy Appreciation month.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Kenneth Berding — 

    This past Sunday (September 14, 2014), my fourth daughter, Ana, was baptized as a believer in Jesus Christ at Corona Del Mar beach with 15 or so others from Redemption Hill Church. We have heard from so many about the impact of her public testimony, so I thought that I might share it as an encouragement to you as well. The testimony is hers, written by her and read out before she was baptized.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Uche Anizor — 

    Inequality is not necessarily inequity. Often talk related to disparities in income, opportunities, education, skills—you name it—centers on the issue of justice or equity. However, it may be that justice or injustice has little to do with inequalities. As in all matters, it is helpful to get somewhat of a God’s eye view on this rather easily misunderstood issue. What I’d like to do is briefly draw attention to one strand of biblical teaching worth considering as we discuss matters of inequality. I’ll do this with the help of Edwards and his eschatology.

  • The Good Book Blog

    William Lane Craig — 

    Hi Sir, I am very glad to meet you through online... I understood the essentiality of trinity, there is no doubt about why I should believe in triune God. But, I have been thinking what could be the reason for son and father relationship in God’s head ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Darian Lockett — 

    The Letters of James, Peter, John, and Jude constitute one of the final frontiers in New Testament studies. Whereas the four Gospels and Paul’s letters have received copious attention, these seven letters, in comparison, constitute the distant shores of a largely unknown world. It is not uncommon to search in vain for substantive treatment of any one of these letters in the standard introductions or theologies of the New Testament. While one can find a handful of introductory texts focusing on “the latter New Testament” or “Hebrews through Revelation,” there are precious few devoted specifically to the Letters of James, Peter, John, and Jude, and almost all fail to consider the possibility of interpreting the Catholic Epistles as a discrete collection.[1] Though considering the canonical collections of the “Gospels” and the “Pauline Epistles,” even the groundbreaking Dictionary for the Theological Interpretation of the Bible (2005) fails to supply an entry for the Catholic Epistles ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Dave Keehn — 

    A family had a priceless family heirloom – a vase – that was passed down one generation to the next generation. One day, the parents of the family who had possession of the vase, left the teenagers at home while they went out shopping for the day. When they returned home, their children met the parents at the door, with sad faces, reporting: “Mother, Father… you know that priceless heirloom our family passes down one generation to the next… while our generation just dropped it”

  • The Good Book Blog

    William Lane Craig — 

    "... I have a question about morality that you'll hopefully be able to answer and clarify your position on. My knowledge of meta-ethics is pretty modest, but I'm actually leaning albeit tentatively towards morality being objective (see, there's at least one thing we agree on!). I'd argue that moral obligation can be objective without God (I won't do that here though), but I'd go even further and say that IF morality is founded in God it is NOT objective. If "objective" means "mind-independent" which might be a rough definition of objective, but let's accept it for now doesn't that make morality founded in God "divinely subjective" rather than objective? ..."

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joe Hellerman — 

    I recently read a fascinating book by Richard Nisbett, who compares and contrasts contemporary Asian and Western worldviews. It just so happens that the strong-group mentality of Nisbett’s Asian culture corresponds in some important ways to the mindset of people in the New Testament world.

  • Biola Magazine

    Blest from the Past

    Editor's Note

    Jason Newell — 

    The cracked and worn booklets that grace this issue’s cover may not look like much today. But a century ago, their humble pages were helping to...

  • Biola Magazine

    Barry Corey — 

    Last summer I received a letter from a Biola dad whose son graduated that year. John, the dad, is an investment broker from the East Coast whose...

  • Biola Magazine

    Warrens Inspire Graduates, Receive Honorary Degrees

    Chuck Colson also honored posthumously at spring commencement ceremony

    Brett McCracken — 

    Biola celebrated the largest graduating class in university history in May, awarding nearly 1,000 degrees during a spring commencement that...

  • Biola Magazine

    Back to the #ProtFuture

    ‘Future of Protestantism’ discussion draws crowd, sparks online discussion

    Brett McCracken — 

    La Mirada felt a little bit like Wittenberg or Geneva on April 29. The eyes of the evangelical theological world focused on Biola’s Calvary...

  • Biola Magazine

    Biola’s First Feature Film Wins Top Prize at Festival

    Professor and filmmaker Dean Yamada talks about the success of Cicada

    Brett McCracken — 

    This spring, Biola University premiered its first-ever feature-length film, Cicada , produced by faculty, students and alumni of the cinema and...

  • Biola Magazine

    Crowell School of Business Welcomes New Dean

    Six things to know about Gary Lindblad

    Biola Magazine Staff — 

    On July 1, Biola’s Crowell School of Business welcomed Gary Lindblad as its new dean. Lindblad, who has directed the MBA program at the Paul Merage...

  • Biola Magazine

    Deep Roots, Deep Faith

    Suzanne Crowell honored with Ruby Award for commitment to Biola

    Jenna Loumagne — 

    Spend an afternoon with Suzanne Crowell and it’s easy to see why she is this year’s Anna Horton Ruby Award recipient. Her tenacity and commitment...

  • Biola Magazine

    Biola Magazine Staff — 

    Softball Biola’s softball team made the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) postseason for the first time since 2002, but was...

  • Biola Magazine

    Home Away From Home

    The Collegium, which opened 10 years ago this fall to serve Biola’s growing off-campus community, is one of the most elegant and inviting spaces on campus

    Jason Newell — 

    For many years, Biola’s commuter students didn’t have much of a place to go between classes, meaning they often had to resort — resort to hang out...

  • Biola Magazine

    The Untold Story of The Fundamentals

    A century ago, Biola founder Lyman Stewart anonymously funded a hugely influential set of essays known as The Fundamentals. Archived letters and documents shed light on how Stewart and others helped to shape the face of evangelicalism today.

    Paul Rood — 

    A remarkable literary project of the early 20th century, The Fundamentals: A Testimony to the Truth, is soon approaching the 100th anniversary of...

  • Biola Magazine

    The Fundamentals vs. 'fundamentalism'

    The Fundamentals publishing project is a part of the history of fundamentalism in America, to be sure, yet the two words are also different in important ways

    Biola Magazine Staff — 

    When talking about The Fundamentals, it’s important to recognize a distinction from “fundamentalism” as it is understood both in history and in...

  • Biola Magazine

    How Can We Be Better Disagree-ers?

    Professor Tim Muehlhoff, author of I Beg to Differ, shares how to tackle tough conversations

    Biola Magazine Staff — 

    Whether in the boardroom or the bedroom, on Twitter or TV, disagreement is a fact of life. And unfortunately, it’s often handled badly — resulting...

  • Biola Magazine

    The Need for ‘Urban Apologetics’

    'To many of my urban pastor peers, apologetics seemed far too detached from the church work they were doing on a daily basis'

    Christopher Brooks — 

    When I first became active in apologetics — the art of commending and defending the Christian faith — I quickly realized that in the minds of most...

  • Biola Magazine

    Diane Vincent — 

    This issue’s Last Word comes from the Torrey Honors Institute’s Scriptorium Daily blog (scriptoriumdaily.com), where it was originally published...

  • The Good Book Blog

    John McKinley — 

    Occasionally I find myself in a conversation with a non-Christian friend. Sometimes, I have to pay close attention to the language I use if the talk turns to things related to God and ultimate reality. I do the same when I talk to my children about Bible things. I want to be understood, but the normal Christian terms are a foreign language to many people, Christians included. The terms are difficult to use when they don’t communicate.

  • The Good Book Blog

    William Lane Craig — 

    Dear Dr. Craig, In his debate with you and, on pp. 175 & 211 in his book "Jesus is Dead," Dr. Robert Price argues that the notion of resurrections are likely not all that unexpected in 2nd Temple Judaism and/or totally absent from the 1st century Jewish world view. He specifically cites the case of some wondering if Jesus is the resurrected John the Baptist. Beyond your answer that points out Price's essential category error (resurrected mere men are not the same thing as the expectation of a resurrected Messiah), could you please elaborate further as to why the two instances (Jesus mistaken as John resurrected and Jewish allowances for a dying & resurrected God) are wholly distinct?

  • The Good Book Blog

    Charlie Trimm — 

    My previous posts have looked at several examples of the different ways God interacted with non-Israelite nations. Ken Berding suggested that I compile a list of the non-Israelite followers of YHWH in the Old Testament. Without further ado, here they are.