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Latest Biola Blog Articles

  • Student Life Blog

    Louie Chong — 

    Trouble reading textbooks? Try this method to improve reading efficiency

  • The Good Book Blog

    Jeffrey Volkmer — 

    In a post on his blog, "Jesus Creed," eminent New Testament scholar Scot McKnight seems to agree with some of the findings of Claude Mariottini's book Rereading the Biblical Text: Searching for Meaning and Understanding which argues that Gen. 3:15 is not in fact messianic. McKnight further points out that such a conclusion agrees with Old Testament luminaries Gordon Wenham and Gerhard von Rad as well as some translations. These, says McKnight, conclude that the “seed” mentioned in Gen. 3:15 refers to not an individual, but rather the sum total of the descendants of both the woman and the serpent ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Sean McDowell — 

    One difficult lesson I have learned in apologetics and evangelism is to identify the question beneath the question. To be honest, I have spent considerable time answering questions I thought people were asking, but because I was operating under false assumptions, I missed the heart of their query. Have you ever made this same mistake? Here are three examples from my own life and ministry, and the brief lesson I learned from each of them ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    How Can We Be Commanded to Believe in God?

    Weekly Q & A with Dr. William Lane Craig

    William Lane Craig — 

    Dear Dr. Craig, Thank you for your work in theology. I am grateful for your broad contributions to discussions about theology and religion in public life. Your philosophical and theological ventures are welcoming, thoughtful and substantive. My question concerns a remark you made in a recent podcast. You mentioned that God commands us to believe in Him. God commanding us believe in Him seems problematic. It is notably articulated by Hasdai Crescas ...

  • Talbot Magazine

    No Disconnect

    How Online Learning Can Build Character and Community

    Joanne Jung — 

    Creating an effective communal environment for learning can be challenging. Technology used well, however, has proven instrumental in addressing and accomplishing these tasks.

  • Talbot Magazine

    YHWH & Genocide

    Reflections on an Unpleasant Topic in the Old Testament

    Charlie Trimm — 

    While the old testament contains multiple “unpleasant” topics for modern readers of the Bible, most likely none are as serious as the question of YHWH’s commanded destruction of the Canaanites. To say the point bluntly, YHWH’s commands to Israel in Deuteronomy 7:1–2 sound suspiciously like genocide: “You must devote them to complete destruction” (Deut. 7:1–2, ESV). The people of Israel followed those instructions when they conquered Jericho (Josh. 6:20–21).

  • Talbot Magazine

    Shelf Life

    Recent publications from our very own Talbot Faculty.

    Gary McIntosh, Ryan Peterson, Scott Rae, Kenneth Way — 

    Growing God’s Church: How People Are Actually Coming to Faith Today; Introducing Christian Ethics: A Short Guide to Making Moral Choices; The Imago Dei as Human Identity: A Theological Interpretation; Judges and Ruth, Teach the Text Commentary Series

  • Talbot Magazine

    Book Excerpt: The Empowering Spirit

    Excerpt adapted from "Ephesians (Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament)," by Clinton E. Arnold

    Clint Arnold — 

    Ephesians has much to say about the nature and work of the Holy Spirit, but one of the most important features of the Spirit’s work is that he represents the empowering presence of God in the lives of believers.

  • Talbot Magazine

    Best of the Blog

    Biblical Necessities? Or Theological Explanations?

    Kenneth Berding — 

    In recent years, I have been helped in my study of the Bible by employing an informal distinction between “biblical necessities” and “theological explanations.” Of all the classes I teach at Talbot, this distinction has been most helpful to students taking a class I teach called “Pauline Theology: Romans.” Since some of my students have benefitted from this distinction, I thought you might appreciate reading about it.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Kenneth Berding — 

    For many years I have been curious about a Roman governor known to us from history as Pliny the Younger. My interest initially arose because I resided for four years in one of the principal cities he governed—not to mention that one of my four daughters was born in that city. Moreover, since I have expended significant effort studying the writings of the earliest Christian authors after the period of the apostles (those authors known as the “Apostolic Fathers”), I continue to be intensely interested in learning anything I possibly can about the lives of Christians who lived during the first half of the second century ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Charlie Trimm — 

    The second chapter of my book on warfare in the ancient Near East (see an overview to the book in a previous post) studies the casus belli of the ancient kings. Although presumably kings often went to war to gain plunder, this was not frequently stated in such bald terms. Instead, the most commonly stated reason for warfare was that the king fought to defeat chaos and preserve order in the world. In this post we will look at the Egyptian and Assyrian claims for preserving order as their goal for war and how these claims help us understand Scripture ...

  • Talbot Magazine

    New Center Established to Focus on Work of the Holy Spirit

    Donor-funded initiative aims for more spiritual transformation and empowerment for evangelism

    Jason Newell — 

    What would happen if Biola were more intentional about understanding the work of the Holy Spirit and developing a greater passion to be led by the empowering and life-giving Spirit of God?

  • Talbot Magazine

    Joanna Wu — 

    An endowed chair has been established in recognition of William Lane Craig, a world-renowned philosopher and theologian who has been teaching at Talbot School of Theology for more than 20 years.

  • Talbot Magazine

    Faculty Profile: Michael Thigpen

    Executive Director of ETS Joins Talbot’s Faculty

    Jeanette Pifer — 

    Michael Thigpen, one of Talbot’s newest faculty members, not only transplanted himself from Kentucky to California, but he has also brought the main office for the Evangelical Theological Society (ETS) as he maintains his role as its executive director.

  • Talbot Magazine

    News Briefs

    M.Div. Program Reduced From 96 to 79 Credits, M.A. Programs Reduced From 64 to 49 Credits, Talbot Rolls Out Three Fully Online M.A. Program Concentrations

    Talbot Magazine Staff — 

    Over the past two years, Talbot faculty have been working hard and creatively to streamline the curriculum in the Master of Divinity program.

  • Talbot Magazine

    Clint Arnold — 

    Sundoulos served us well for many years. But not everyone knew what the term “sundoulos” meant. As much as I like Greek, that is the danger of quoting it in your sermons, Bible studies and magazine names. “Sundoulos” is a fellow servant, and our intent is to be just that. We want to continue to serve you in the ministries where God has called you.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Sean McDowell — 

    Jonathan Morrow is one of the top communicators for both students and adults on apologetics and cultural issues. He is adjunct professor of Apologetics at Biola University (with me!) and director of cultural engagement at Impact 360 Institute where he teaches high school and college students. Check out his website and Twitter account: jonathanmorrow.org and @Jonathan_Morrow. We co-authored the book Is God Just A Human Invention? together in 2010. Last week he released an update of his classic book Welcome to College. This has been one of the top books I recommend for future college students to read so they can experience relational, emotional, academic, and spiritual success. Check out this interview and if you are an aspiring college student, or you know one, consider getting a copy of his excellent book ...

  • Student Life Blog

    Norlan Hernandez — 

    You are not in the classroom and have many things competing for your time and attention.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Resurrections prior to the World’s End?

    Weekly Q & A with Dr. William Lane Craig

    William Lane Craig — 

    Fact 4, Point 2 in your opening statement of the debate with Bart Ehrman: you state that Jewish views of the afterlife precluded having a glorified existence prior to the general resurrection. Yet, the accounts of the Transfiguration of Jesus, three disciples saw Moses and Elijah. Elijah, according to the account in Kings, never died, but Moses is recorded as having died at the end of Deuteronomy. Whether or not he was actually raised and glorified in the same sense they came to believe Jesus was, could they not have believed that to be the case? Apparitions of the dead (Samuel to Saul and the medium at En-dor) were not unknown in the OT ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Sean McDowell — 

    I love reading. And what better time is there to read than summer? While there are certainly plenty of good books to read, here are five of my personal favorites. While they tend to be in the category of apologetics and culture, these books were all “game changers” for me that either led me to act or see the world differently ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Kenneth Way — 

    In his forthcoming summative book, called Beyond the Texts, the Syro-Palestinian archaeologist William G. Dever summarizes what is presently known about ancient Israel and Judah based primarily on the artifacts—the material culture that includes textual sources. One example is Dever’s portrait of the historical King David. He offers the following seven propositions about David that are inferred from archaeology and also converge with what is attested in biblical texts ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Kenneth Berding — 

    I just finished reading Owen Strachan’s book, Awakening the Evangelical Mind: An Intellectual History of the Neo-Evangelical Movement. He has some good words for how to keep evangelical universities, well … evangelical. These three paragraphs are worth the three minutes it will take you to read them ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Sean McDowell — 

    A few summers ago I was doing my “Atheist Encounter” at a large student Christian camp in the Midwest. While the interaction with the audience sometimes gets heated (since I role-play an atheist, after all) the students in this session were far testier and argumentative than normal ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    “What if—?” Questions

    Weekly Q & A with Dr. William Lane Craig

    William Lane Craig — 

    Dear Dr. Craig I have been a fan of your work for about 2 or 3 years now. I used to be an atheist until one of my Christian friends directed me to your website and now I would consider myself to be struggling with atheism/scientism and Christianity. The last few days an idea has shaken up my worldview and my trust that philosophy can prove the existence of God. I think I can best sum up the idea as such ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Dave Keehn — 

    Summer movies are often the stories of heroes; whether real-life or Marvel®, both are super. These stories inspire as they entertain us. The problem is, most of the time, we are content with letting someone else be the hero. We are too busy, too passive, too self-absorbed, or too afraid of what would happen if we got involved; and so the people around us stay unknown to us and do not receive the help they need. The result is preconceived biases that isolate us from one another and a lack of care and compassion for those who need a place of refuge and relief ...