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Posts by Joanne Jung



  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    ... Collaborative learning focuses on both content and the process of learning. C.S. Lewis stated, “It often happens that two schoolboys can solve difficulties in their work for one another better than the master can” (Lewis, 1958). Participation, dialogue, and reciprocity are key elements necessary for students to sense and know they are included in something greater than themselves. Meaningful dialogue in a variety of formats inspires critical thinking and reflection, combats mental inertia, and fosters transformation. Students may come curious, but they leave inspired ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    ... Character formation begins with a proper understanding of the heart and soul. The heart is often misrepresented in American culture, for the heart has much more to do with how we live than what we might be led to believe. Perhaps the closest we can come to this idea is when we speak of doing something “whole-heartedly.” In Proverbs 4:23, believers are warned: “Guard your heart above all else, for it is the source of life” (HCSB). Mentioned nearly one thousand times in God’s word, it is clear that the heart is important to God. Three components make up the human heart: mind, emotion, and will (Coe, 2011). The mind, the thinking function of the heart, is where our thoughts are received, processed, and formed. Emotions are tied to thoughts as we have feelings about all thoughts. The will is an expression of what we actually do (or do not do) with our thoughts. Components of the heart—mind, emotion, and will—are often examined separately but were created to function together. They make up who we are. Our lives are our hearts in motion because the heart is the control center of the soul ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    Joanne Jung (Associate Professor of Biblical and Theological Studies at Talbot School of Theology) recently finished writing Character Formation in Online Education: A Guide for Instructors, Administrators, and Accrediting Agencies and it will be released on October 13, 2015. We wanted to learn more about this book, so we had Joanne respond to some questions ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    Have you ever wondered what theology and ice cream have in common? Some Zondervan authors shed some light on the matter, and our very own Dr. Joanne Jung chimes in.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    The shortest Good Book Blog entry to date.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    Maybe it’s because I’m on sabbatical. Then again, maybe it’s because I just became a grandmother. For whatever reason, I collected these thoughts: acts of life for every day ...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    After being unresponsive for two days, my dad was escorted into the presence of his Savior on Saturday May 4, 2013 at 2 AM. Family and friends gathered to celebrate his life last Friday. I shared these words:

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    Something to ponder about an ancient Chinese word...

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    Hell. I don't think about this subject often, so you can imagine my surprise when I found such moving thoughts on hell from an author I regard: John Bunyan.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    Disneyland's Candlelight Processional on Main Street U.S.A. was surprisingly focused on Christ. Beautifully performed musical selections were interspersed between the readings based on the biblical narrative of Jesus’ birth, life, and death. Yes, his birth, life, and death. Disappointed that Jesus’ resurrection was not explicitly mentioned (Maybe next year, Disneyland), but pleasantly surprised by any mention of Jesus’ life beyond his birth. Many moments were just plain worshipful. Part of that worship was seeing the biblical narrative heard by thousands each night.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    My article, "Building a Better Small Group," was just posted by The Gospel Coalition.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    It's Good Friday, just after noon.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    This post is written for and dedicated to those who desire a deeper communion with God through prayer and who struggle with distractions, distortions, or disillusionment.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    It happened this past Sunday. The moment my daughter said, "I do," I became a mother-in-love. No one knew except the wedding planner, but I had written a letter addressed to my daughter and had it read in the presence of our guests at the reception. Though short, it was long in writing, as the memories, emotions, and tears often paralyzed yet drove the process. I share these words with you.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    I get the most puzzled looks whenever I pose this question. How you answer it will reveal whether you truly know a certain truth about yourself.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    If you think the book of Ruth is some kind of self help program to become the best mother-in-law (or daughter-in-law), you will have missed the whole idea of why it's included in Scripture. It was written by one who carefully, skillfully, and dramatically records - with a surprise ending to the book - the events of a seemingly insignificant, desperate family. I brought this message to the audience attending Biola's chapel on Grandparents Day. It's 22 minutes short, but "the view is spectacular."

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    Pop Quiz. Identify the correct company to which these advertising jingles are associated: “You deserve a break today” “Have it your way” “Rule the Air” Fascinating how advertising agencies craft a need for a product while feeding the human ego. The underlying message in these jingles is that it really is all about you.

  • The Good Book Blog

    Joanne Jung — 

    In the current spiritual formation culture it is easy to equate our spirituality with undertaking spiritual disciplines. There is a temptation to think of spiritual formation as the result of a formula—that if I just do certain activities, I’ll be mature. Frustration can set in, however, when we don’t see any immediate change. What helps is remembering that our spiritual transformation is a life-long process and knowing that we are not left alone in this undertaking. Indeed, each of the members of the Trinity plays a part.