Courses | B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies

Summary

Below are some of the courses you’ll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising. For official program requirements see catalog for details.


Course Overview

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.


Major Courses

Introduction to interdisciplinary studies, including the nature of integrative learning, learning skills, basic disciplinary methodologies, and the characteristics of the interdisciplinary student of human nature. Emphasis is placed on the development of critical thinking skills and written and oral communication. Grade Mode: A.
Reinforcement of interdisciplinary theories, thought, and practice applied to the the disciplinary emphases courses currently being taken by students in the course. Grade Mode: A.
Reinforcement of interdisciplinary theories, thought, and practice applied to the the disciplinary emphases courses currently being taken by students in the course. Grade Mode: A.
This course examines a variety of significant topics through the lens of multiple disciplines. This course emphasizes an interdisciplinary understanding of the selected topic and will expect students to analyze and synthesize materials. The course builds on competencies introduced in ITDS 220. Grade Mode: A.
This course focuses on applying interdisciplinary thought to a student selected research project based on concepts and methods explored in their course of study. This capstone course is the culminating academic experience of the Interdisciplinary Studies major. Grade Mode: A.

Organizational Management Specialization

Presents a conceptual overview of the principles of management. The functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling are analyzed. The leader's perspective on creating competitive advantage in a global environment is related to the topics of diversity, ethics and social responsibility, human resources, corporate culture and organizational structure. Grade Mode: A.
A study of the relevant ideas and developments in the field of human resource management that permit organizations of all types to improve productivity, quality and service. EEO, staffing, training, compensation and labor relations are all emphasized. Grade Mode: A.
This course explores the increasing power of customers in the new millennium marketplace and the need for organizations to be customer-driven. The course explores rapid advancements in digital business technology and the capabilities of customer database software that enable firms to differentiate customers by value and anticipate best and most valuable customer's needs. Grade Mode: A.
An examination and evaluation of personal and organizational leadership principles with practical application in contemporary leadership and management settings. Students will develop their ability to lead change productively. Students will study servant leadership, modeled by Jesus and learn how to apply servant leadership within organizational functions and environments. Grade Mode: A.

English Specialization

A study of selected writers and their works from 1616 to 1832. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Literature credit. Grade Mode: A.
A study of selected writers from the Age of Realism through the present day. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Literature credit. Grade Mode: A.
Introductory language course for education students: history of language, grammatical systems, usage/composition; teaching applications. Grade Mode: A.
Specific eras and movements in American literature. Two or more sections offered every year. The sections include American literature from Colonial America, the Constitution to the Civil War, the Civil War to the New Deal, and the New Deal to the present. Notes: May be taken multiple times for credit with different content. Grade Mode: A.
Specific eras and movements in literature from the nations of the British Isles: Wales, Scotland, the Republic of Ireland, and England. The sections include: Medieval literature, Renaissance literature, 17th-century literature, 18th-century literature, Romanticism, Victorian literature, Early 20th-century literature, and contemporary literature. Notes: May be taken multiple times for credit with different content. Grade Mode: A.
An overview of the major concepts in 20th- and 21st-century literary theory and an introduction to the major approaches in contemporary critical theory, including formalism, myth criticism, hermeneutics, deconstruction, feminism, psychoanalytic criticism, Marxism, post-colonial theory and the new historicism. Grade Mode: A.

History Specialization

Required course for history majors. Introduces students to the discipline of history, to reading historical primary and secondary sources, to the steps of a quality research project, and to writing a research paper. Books on the methodology will be used, and one longer book on topics chosen by the instructor. Notes: Should be taken in the sophomore year or as close to that as possible for transfer students. .Grade Mode: A.

Settlement and growth of the Anglo-American civilization; the American Revolution; growth of political, economic, social and religious institutions to 1800. Grade Mode: A.

Social impact of westward expansion, immigration, industrialization, urbanization and cultural pluralism combined with major intellectual ideas instrumental in the shaping of American society. Grade Mode: A.

Post-Civil War economic growth, immigration, trans-Mississippi settlement, industrialization, urbanization; America's rise to world power, Progressive Era and World War I. Grade Mode: A.

Survey the history of the American West, beginning with Lewis and Clark and continuing to the present. Will briefly cover the West prior to the arrival of the Americans, but focuses primarily on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Will examine some of the major themes in Western history, including early explorers, the expansion of the American frontier, the experiences of Native American tribes, the growth of ranching, railroads and mines, conflicts over urbanization and environmentalism, and the role of the federal government in the economic development of the west in the 20th Century. Grade Mode: A.
Russia from the origin of the nation, the Soviet period, and post-Soviet era. Analysis of Czardom, the Revolution and international relations in the modern world. Grade Mode: A.
Europe from the late 14th to early 17th century. Stress on changes inaugurated by the Renaissance and Reformation; rise of nation-states and foundations of modern European society. Grade Mode: A.
The history of Europe, including Russia, from 1550 to 1900. Wars of Religion, Scientific Revolution, Absolutism and political theory; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; the nineteenth century. Grade Mode: A.
Europe in the era of World War I, the rise of Communism, Fascism and Hitler's Nazi Party; World War II and the post-war period; the Cold War and the collapse of the communist system. Grade Mode: A.
Political, social and cultural history of the Middle East with an emphasis on Islamic civilization to 1453. Special emphasis on relationships of Muslim and non-Muslim peoples under Islamic rule. Grade Mode: A.
Political, social and cultural history of the Middle East with an emphasis on Islamic civilization from 1453. Special emphasis on the development of the Middle Eastern state system following the First World War. Special emphasis on the Arab-Israeli conflict. Grade Mode: A.
Focusing on Jerusalem, students will study the diplomatic and political history of the conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis. Emphasis on Christian Zionism, political Islam, and international relations. Depending on the students in the class, position papers will be used either in simulated negotiations or panel discussions. Grade Mode: A.
This course asks students to summarize and reflect on the historical content, methodology, and academic skills learned as History majors. It tests the mastery of the learning outcomes of the major. It discusses life skills, career skills, the value of history to a Christian worldview, careers for History majors, and graduate school. Notes: Required for all History majors. Grade Mode: A.

Philosophy Specialization

An introduction to the philosophical concept of practical wisdom, incorporating a survey of the wisdom traditions and special attention to the tradition of Christian wisdom rooted in the teachings of Jesus. Grade Mode: A.
A seminar designed to assist its members in practical application of insights from PHIL 230. Grade Mode: A.
The history of philosophy in the West from the Pre-Socratics through the Neo-Platonists. In contrast to 211, the lower-division course which covers the same period, this course is designed for students who have already taken at least one course in philosophy and are expected to achieve at a higher level of learning. Grade Mode: A.
The history and philosophy in the West from Augustine to William of Occam, with special emphasis upon Augustine and Thomas Aquinas. In contrast to 212, the lower-division course which covers the same period, this course is designed for students who have already taken at least one course in philosophy and are expected to achieve at a higher level of learning. Grade Mode: A.
The history of philosophy in the West from the Renaissance through the 18th century. In contrast to 213, the lower-division course which covers the same period, this course is designed for students who have already taken at least one course in philosophy and are expected to achieve at a higher level of learning. Grade Mode: A.

Sociology Specialization

Sociological concepts with emphasis on group life, culture, socialization, social institutions, social processes and change. Theoretical as well as practical application of interaction and its effect on individuals in groups. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Behavioral Science credit. Grade Mode: A.
Examines gender as an organizing principle in societies at all levels. The course explores the key theoretical approaches to sociology of gender and explains how historical, economic, and political trends impact gender and gender identity, as well as the impact of gender on various social institutions such as the family, government, the workplace, education, and the criminal justice system. Grade Mode: A.
Race, and companion factors such as ethnicity, social economic class, gender and age are critical factors in the administration of criminal justice in the United States. This course critically examines race, class and gender within the United States criminal justice system. Grade Mode: A.
Analysis of ethnic, racial and cultural minorities in the U.S. and selected world cultures and societies through use of basic concepts of race, racism, prejudice, discrimination, stereotypes; theoretical as well as practical application of concepts and effects on selected minority-majority relationships and racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. Grade Mode: A.
Examination of the basic dimensions of inequality in contemporary American society, how inequality is patterned by race, class and gender, and the effects of inequality on life chances and lifestyles. International comparisons of systems of inequality also examined. Grade Mode: A.
An examination of the development of social theory beginning with theorists such as Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, and continuing through the subsequent development of 20th century social theory. Major issues include the relation between the individual and society, the sources of conflict and change in society, the role of ideas and beliefs in shaping human behavior, and the importance of social theory for the thinking, critically active Christian. Grade Mode: A.
This course examines the ways in which social researchers collect and analyze information. Experimental research designs, field research, survey techniques, and statistical data analysis are used quite frequently in our 'information society'. Political polls, opinion polls, market research, demographic studies, as well as sociological research rely on these techniques. This course is designed to give students a better understanding of these techniques so they can critically evaluate these types of social research. It is also designed to give students practical skills in conducting research which will be helpful no matter what profession they enter. Grade Mode: A.

Art History Specialization

The first of a two-part survey of Western visual art and architecture, this course explores the ancient origins of Western art as well as its expressions in the Medieval and Renaissance periods. Works of art are discussed in terms of style, meaning, and social context. Grade Mode: A.
The second of a two-part survey of Western visual art and architecture, this course explores the great contributions to this tradition from the seventeenth century through the mid-twentieth century. Works of art are discussed in terms of style, meaning, and social context. Grade Mode: A.
The history of painting, sculpture and architecture from 1850 to 1940. Major aesthetic issues that shaped 20th Century art and influenced the early 21st Century will be examined. Grade Mode: A.
A study of art produced since World War II, focusing on current movements within the international art community. Grade Mode: A.
Individual or group study under faculty direction with an emphasis in art history, art theory and criticism. Notes: Seminars may be taken multiple times for credit with different content for a total of 12 credits. Grade Mode: A.
Individual or group study under faculty direction with an emphasis in studio art and creative research. Notes: Seminars may be taken multiple times for credit. Grade Mode: A.
Investigation of non-western art and architecture in relationship to its currency within the global contemporary art scene. Emphasis is placed on the influence of major forms, functions and materials used by the peoples of Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas in regards to contemporary art. Grade Mode: A.
A cross-discipline studio and theory seminar focusing on individual and collaborative thematic investigations. Grade Mode: A.
An intensive, reading seminar focusing on writings that have influenced contemporary art criticism and theory. Course focuses on specific authors and/or themes that have impacted the production and discussion of art within the 21st Century. Grade Mode: A.

Studio/Art History Hybrid Specialization

An introduction to drawing, perspective, line, shape, value texture and composition. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Fine Arts credit. Grade Mode: A.
An introduction to the fundamentals of drawing the human figure from gesture to finished work. This course focuses on the structure and dynamics of the human body and its expressive potential. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Fine Arts credit. Grade Mode: A.
Introduction to the methods, materials, and tools of sculpture and general concepts of sculptural form. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Fine Arts credit. Grade Mode: A.
An introduction to basic hand building and wheel throwing techniques. Formulation of basic glaze applications and ceramics firing processes are emphasized. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Fine Arts credit. Grade Mode: A.
An introduction to basic color theory and oil painting techniques. Emphasis on observational representation including still-life, landscape and figure. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Fine Arts credit. Grade Mode: A.
A survey of contemporary art photography, introducing the practices of darkroom, digital, black and white, and color photography, with an emphasis on technical and conceptual aspects. Notes: Highly recommended that students own or have access to both 35mm film and digital SLR cameras. Approved for Core Curriculum Fine Arts credit. Grade Mode: A.
Continued individual development in all areas of ceramics. Introducing vessel construction from hand-built techniques, low fire glaze applications and an introduction in firing the kilns. Grade Mode: A.
Emphasizes sculptural aesthetics and appropriate technology. Focus on formulating a conceptual and technical basis for work. Grade Mode: A.
Exploration of the overlapping relationships of traditional and experimental methods of drawing: to include processes, tools, and surfaces. Concentration on issues of formal, narrative, and symbolic development with emphasis placed on finished works of art. Grade Mode: A.
Introduction to non-representational acrylic painting techniques. Emphasis on issues of color and design as applied to organic, geometric, and pattern abstraction. Grade Mode: A.
The history of painting, sculpture and architecture from 1850 to 1940. Major aesthetic issues that shaped 20th Century art and influenced the early 21st Century will be examined. Grade Mode: A.
A study of art produced since World War II, focusing on current movements within the international art community. Grade Mode: A.
A studio exploration of color photography using digital and film techniques. Emphasis placed on color theory, contemporary issues, and the technical skills of artificial lighting and professional digital printing workflow. Notes: Highly recommended that students own or have access to digital SLR camera. Grade Mode: A.
Extensive investigation of the figure. Emphasis is placed on a broad approach to understanding and interpreting the human figure. Grade Mode: A.
Advanced studio exploration in contemporary photographic trends, including mixed media, installation, collaboration, and various new media. Notes: Highly recommended that students own or have access to a digital SLR camera. Grade Mode: A.
Individual or group study under faculty direction with an emphasis in art history, art theory and criticism. Notes: Seminars may be taken multiple times for credit with different content for a total of 12 credits. Grade Mode: A.
Extensive exploration in studio problems with emphasis on historical and current issues as they apply to individual direction and expression in drawing. Grade Mode: A.
Individual or group study under faculty direction with an emphasis in studio art and creative research. Notes: Seminars may be taken multiple times for credit. Grade Mode: A.
Extensive exploration in studio problems with emphasis on historical and current issues as they apply to individual direction and expression in painting. Grade Mode: A.
Advanced sculptural concepts emphasizing individual development of style, aesthetic ideas, and continuation of media exploration. Grade Mode: A.
Investigation of non-western art and architecture in relationship to its currency within the global contemporary art scene. Emphasis is placed on the influence of major forms, functions and materials used by the peoples of Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas in regards to contemporary art. Grade Mode: A.
A cross-discipline studio and theory seminar focusing on individual and collaborative thematic investigations. Grade Mode: A.
An intensive, reading seminar focusing on writings that have influenced contemporary art criticism and theory. Course focuses on specific authors and/or themes that have impacted the production and discussion of art within the 21st Century. Grade Mode: A.
Independent research in advanced studio practices under the direction of a faculty member. Notes: See academic advisor prior to registration. Practicum may be taken multiple times for credit. Grade Mode: A.

Environmental Science Specialization

An interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment using concepts from ecology, biology, chemistry, geology, the social sciences and Scripture to understand the interplay of natural resources, how humans are affecting the environment, and how to deal with environmental problems. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Science credit. Grade Mode: A.
Introductory course for biological science majors emphasizing the principles of systematics and biodiversity, population genetics and origins theories, ecology, and anatomy and physiology. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Science credit. Grade Mode: A.
This laboratory, which accompanies BIOS 114, will involve dissection as well as experimentation. A field project involving the La Mirada Creek is included. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Science credit. Grade Mode: A.
Environmental analysis and natural resources analysis in relation to society and developmental issues. Focus on ecological sustainability and sustainable society in the context of various factors that are bringing environmental degradation and impoverishment of people and cultures. Topics include tropical agriculture, hunger, poverty, international debt, appropriate technology, relief programs, missionary earthkeeping, conservation of wild nature, land tenure and land stewardship. Employs a discussion format grappling with difficult practical and ethical problems and issues that require deep and personal thought. Notes: Biola or Au Sable offering. Grade Mode: A.
Systematics, distribution, behavior and ecology of the common plants and animals of the selected domestic or international sire or region. Emphasis is on the site's biodiversity, ecology, and associated conservation issues. Trips to domestic sites may occur during Interterm or Summer terms, as well as on Saturdays or weekends during the school year. Domestic sites may include the LA region, the Sierra, the Grand Canyon, and the Channel Islands. Trips to international sites may occur in the Interterm or Summer term and may include studies world-wide. Both domestic and international sites will vary from year to year based on faculty interest and student support and enrollment. Notes: Students taking this course as an elective will have different assignments than BIOS and BIES majors. Credits vary based on different lengths of time at the study site. Grade Mode: A.
Investigation of contemporary problems in environmental stewardship including the use of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources, pollution, appropriate land use and development, third world concerns, and preservation of wild nature. In addition to developing a Christian environmental ethic from a stewardship perspective, the course considers such movements and issues as deep ecology and ecofeminism, animal rights, wilderness ethics, wildlife management, biodiversity, and agro-ecology. Emphasis on considering concrete, current ethical debate. Notes: Biola or Au Sable offering. Grade Mode: A.
Principles of conservation biology with applications to sustainable human society and biospheric integrity. An integrative approach to biology and society that interrelates population biology, ecological principles, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem functions, and human society in the context of biospheric degradation. The course develops a stewardship perspective rooted in biological principles and directed at conservation of plant and animal species, biotic communities, ecosystems, and human society. Included are topics of human development, poverty, and economic growth.Fee: $95 Notes: Biola and Au Sable offering. Grade Mode: A.

General Political Science Specialization

Introduces students to the theories and key concepts of international relations and to comparative political systems. Grade Mode: A.
This travel course engages students with principles of liberty and the free market, their application in the Industrial Age, and the challenges of modern free market England. The course is unique in its focus on the economics, politics, and philosophy of markets. Grade Mode: A.
Students will wrestle with the major themes, ideas, and structures of the American experiment in democratic government. Special emphasis will be given to the American founding, the evolving role of religion in the American public order, and the essential connections and issues involved with a distinctively Christian approach to the discipline of Political Science. Notes: This course is the required introductory course to American politics for all Political Science majors.Grade Mode: A.
This course introduces fundamental philosophical debates surrounding freedom, justice, and equality as it relates to the best that has been thought and said on these topics. This course also introduces students to the cardinal and Christian virtues and how they might inform one's personal development and political philosophy. Models of statesmanship and political virtue will be examined as models for the cultivation of virtue as it applies to politics. Grade Mode: A.
Examines the history of US foreign policy; foreign policy processes and theories; key global organizations; and comparative foreign policies of world powers. Grade Mode: A.
Introduces the Western way of war and the basic theories of key military strategists; explores contemporary problems in national security strategy such as WMD and cyberwar; and evaluates questions of just war and pacifism, and the ethics of modern military technology, from a Christian perspective. Grade Mode: A.
A study of selected works of ancient and medieval political philosophy. Emphasis on such writers as Plato, Aristotle, Hebrew Scripture, Early Church Fathers and Augustine. Careful reading in primary sources, class discussion and written interpretation. Grade Mode: A.
A study of selected works of Renaissance and modern political philosophy. Emphasis on such writers as Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Nietzsche and others. Careful reading in primary sources, class discussion and written interpretation. Grade Mode: A.
Examines the moral, pragmatic, religious and philosophic arguments for democratic capitalism. Explores the rise of the free enterprise system, and evaluates what it assumes about human nature, society, the means of production, and the possibilities (and limits) of public policy. Connects these foundational arguments to Scripture on dignity and work, the economy, private property, theft, and pressing public policy issues. Grade Mode: A.

Communication Studies Specialization

Descriptions and applications of communication theories such as symbolic interaction, relational theories, narrative paradigm and selected group operational theories. Grade Mode: A.
Application, practice and analysis of selected communication forms from a rhetorical perspective. Sections offered in political, social issues and nonverbal communication. Notes: May be taken multiple times with different course content. Grade Mode: A.
Various aspects and problems in the fields of communication. Notes: May be taken multiple times with different course content. Grade Mode: A.
Study and analysis of intercultural communication and identity within the context of the United States. Grade Mode: A.
Selected communication topics varied by semester. Sections offered include: gender studies, relational studies, family communication, leadership communication, and engaging worldviews. Notes: May be taken multiple times for credit with different course content. Grade Mode: A.

Spanish: Second Language Learners Specialization

This is an intermediate course designed to further develop basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by focusing on the cultural content, vocabulary and grammar necessary to develop intercultural communicative competence at an intermediate-high proficiency level. Grade Mode: A.
This course will help develop students' vocabulary and register while reviewing advanced grammatical structures of Spanish through thematic units, which target the development of advanced-level oral and written proficiency through readings and discussion of Spanish texts and culture broadly defined (film, literature, newspapers, pop culture, etc.), as well as writing assignments and oral presentations. Grade Mode: A.
This course will help develop students' vocabulary and register while reviewing advanced grammatical structures of Spanish through thematic units, which target the development of advanced-level oral and written proficiency through readings and discussion of Spanish texts and culture broadly defined (film, literature, newspapers, pop culture, etc.), as well as writing assignments and oral presentations. Grade Mode: A.

Spanish: Heritage Language Learners Specialization

This course will build upon and further develop the informal knowledge of Spanish that heritage learners bring to the classroom--usually from family and neighborhood exposure to the language--and cultivate formal speaking, reading, and writing abilities. Notes: Students are not expected to have any formal training in written Spanish prior to enrolling in this course. Students desiring to enroll in Spanish are strongly advised to do so during their freshman and sophomore years. Grade Mode: A.

This course seeks to broaden the informal knowledge of Spanish that heritage learners bring to the classroom and focuses primarily on the development of formal speaking, reading, and writing abilities across a variety of topics and genres. Notes: Students may take one or both courses in the series based upon the recommendation of their instructor or program advisor. Grade Mode: A.

This course seeks to broaden the informal knowledge of Spanish that heritage learners bring to the classroom and focuses primarily on the development of formal speaking, reading, and writing abilities across a variety of topics and genres. Notes: Students may take one or both courses in the series based upon the recommendation of their instructor or program advisor. Grade Mode: A.

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