Courses | Social Science, B.A.

Course Overview

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.

Summary

Below are some of the courses you’ll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising. For official program requirements see catalog for details.

Prerequisites and General Education

A survey of U.S. History from the time of European settlement, to the colonial period, to independence from Britain, the formation of the republic and the constitution, the issues of the early 1800s, and the Civil War.

A survey of U.S. history from Reconstruction, to the gilded age and progressive era, to the world wars, the cold war, and the present age. Major Supreme Court cases will be covered as will social and ethnic issues.

Highlights in the development of World civilization with an overview of Western, Asian, African and Latin American civilizations to 1500. Examination of comparative cultural contributions made in the arts, sciences, government and religions. Includes regional geographic studies.

Highlights in the development of World civilization with an overview of Western, Asian, African and Latin American civilizations since 1500. Examination of comparative cultural contributions made in the arts, sciences, government and religions. Includes regional geographic studies.

The history, organization and function of the legislative, judicial and executive branches of the American government. Includes one hour per week involving students in a local government civic service or life experience activity. Satisfies the state requirement in institutions in American history.

Major Courses

Special studies in history for majors utilizing the techniques of problem-solving, research and formal writing. Non-majors may undertake special study in specific geographical areas; Latin America, Europe, Asia, United States, Near East and Africa.

Micro and macro economic terms and concepts of economic reasoning with an emphasis on the application of these concepts to current economic issues, including: the elements of America's market economy including supply and demand, profit, competition, pricing, incentives, private property and the debate between free market and regulation; the relationship between politics and economics; the U.S. labor market and aggregate economic behavior and policy; and international trade, and global regulation and cooperation.

Research and writing for Political Science majors (Political Science or Public Administration concentration). In-depth research of original sources and/or empirical studies, culminating in the development of a research paper. Special studies in public administration for majors utilizing the techniques of problem solving, research and effective communication and writing.

This course examines the ways in which social researchers collect and analyze information. Experimental research designs, field research, survey techniques, and statistical data analysis are used quite frequently in our "information society." Political polls, opinion polls, market research, demographic studies, as well as sociological research rely on these techniques. This course is designed to give students a better understanding of these techniques so they can critically evaluate these types of social research. It is also designed to give students practical skills in conducting research which will be helpful no matter what profession they enter.

Elective Courses

Students select multiple courses from upper-division Political Science, History, Sociology, and Cook School of Intercultural Studies. See catalog for details.


Concentrations

History

Political Science

Sociology