Courses | Philosophy, B.A.

Course Overview

Summary

Below are some of the courses you’ll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising. For official program requirements see catalog for details.

Major Courses

A general introduction to logic covering both deductive and inductive inference, and the analysis of arguments in ordinary language. Notes: Approved for Core Curriculum Philosophy credit.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A study of 1) some common types of philosophical arguments and 2) a set of skills necessary for good philosophical writing.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

An introduction to the philosophical concept of practical wisdom, incorporating a survey of the wisdom traditions and special attention to the tradition of Christian wisdom rooted in the teachings of Jesus.
Grade Mode: A.
Corequisites: PHIL 231.
Restrictions: Must be Philosophy (PHIL) or Humanities:Philosophy (HUPH); and Undergraduate Level.

A seminar designed to assist its members in practical application of insights from PHIL 230.
Grade Mode: A.
Corequisites: PHIL 230.
Restrictions: Must be Philosophy (PHIL) or Humanities:Philosophy (HUPH); and Undergraduate Level.

The history of philosophy in the West from the Pre-Socratics through the Neo-Platonists. In contrast to 211, the lower-division course which covers the same period, this course is designed for students who have already taken at least one course in philosophy and are expected to achieve at a higher level of learning.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 213 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

The history and philosophy in the West from Augustine to William of Occam, with special emphasis upon Augustine and Thomas Aquinas. In contrast to 212, the lower-division course which covers the same period, this course is designed for students who have already taken at least one course in philosophy and are expected to achieve at a higher level of learning.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 or PHIL 213 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

The history of philosophy in the West from the Renaissance through the 18th century. In contrast to 213, the lower-division course which covers the same period, this course is designed for students who have already taken at least one course in philosophy and are expected to achieve at a higher level of learning.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

An examination of topics in the philosophy of religion such as traditional arguments for the existence of God, religious epistemology, the problem of evil, and religious pluralism.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 213 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A critical examination of 1) selected metaphysical topics and problems and 2) the nature and scope of human knowledge.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 213 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A study of the principal ethical theories and thinkers, basic ethical problems, and related biblical teaching.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 213 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

An intensive study of one or more wisdom traditions.
Prerequisites: PHIL 230 and PHIL 231.
Grade Mode: A.
Corequisites: PHIL 331.
Restrictions: Must be Philosophy (PHIL) or Humanities:Philosophy (HUPH); and Undergraduate Level.

A seminar designed to assist its members in practical application of insights from PHIL 330.
Grade Mode: A.
Corequisites: PHIL 330.
Restrictions: Must be Philosophy (PHIL) or Humanities:Philosophy (HUPH); and Undergraduate Level.

Reading, study, and application of the insights of one or more texts from a wisdom tradition.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210, PHIL 211, PHIL 212, PHIL 213, PHIL 214, PHIL 215, PHIL 216, or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Reading, study, and application of insights of a thinker from one of the wisdom traditions.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210, PHIL 211, PHIL 212, PHIL 213, PHIL 214, PHIL 215, PHIL 216, or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Reading and study in selected topics, thinkers, or periods in the history of philosophy.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210, PHIL 211, PHIL 212, PHIL 213, PHIL 214, PHIL 215, PHIL 216, or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Reading and study in a single division or sub-division of philosophy, such as aesthetics, the philosophy of religion, and the philosophy of science.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210, PHIL 211, PHIL 212, PHIL 213, PHIL 214, PHIL 215, PHIL 216, or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Reading and study in selected topics in philosophy with special attention to contemporary developments in the philosophical literature.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210, PHIL 211, PHIL 212, PHIL 213, PHIL 214, PHIL 215, PHIL 216, or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Reading, research and discussion in selected philosophical topics and problems with an emphasis on research and writing skills necessary for successful graduate work in philosophy.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210, PHIL 211, PHIL 212, PHIL 213, PHIL 214, PHIL 215, PHIL 216, or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

Directed research in topics chosen in consultation with the philosophy faculty. The student will write a substantial paper in philosophy, with some application to the Christian faith.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210, PHIL 220, PHIL 230, PHIL 231; PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Senior Class; and Philosophy (PHIL); Undergraduate Level.


Concentrations

Liberal Arts

The liberal arts concentration coursework is separated into five blocks. See course catalog for more details.

A study of 1) some common types of philosophical arguments and 2) a set of skills necessary for good philosophical writing.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

An introduction to the philosophical concept of practical wisdom, incorporating a survey of the wisdom traditions and special attention to the tradition of Christian wisdom rooted in the teachings of Jesus.
Grade Mode: A.
Corequisites: PHIL 231.
Restrictions: Must be Philosophy (PHIL) or Humanities:Philosophy (HUPH); and Undergraduate Level.

A seminar designed to assist its members in practical application of insights from PHIL 230.
Grade Mode: A.
Corequisites: PHIL 230.
Restrictions: Must be Philosophy (PHIL) or Humanities:Philosophy (HUPH); and Undergraduate Level.

The history of philosophy in the West from the Pre-Socratics through the Neo-Platonists. In contrast to 211, the lower-division course which covers the same period, this course is designed for students who have already taken at least one course in philosophy and are expected to achieve at a higher level of learning.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 213 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

The history and philosophy in the West from Augustine to William of Occam, with special emphasis upon Augustine and Thomas Aquinas. In contrast to 212, the lower-division course which covers the same period, this course is designed for students who have already taken at least one course in philosophy and are expected to achieve at a higher level of learning.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 or PHIL 213 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

The history of philosophy in the West from the Renaissance through the 18th century. In contrast to 213, the lower-division course which covers the same period, this course is designed for students who have already taken at least one course in philosophy and are expected to achieve at a higher level of learning.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A critical examination of 1) selected metaphysical topics and problems and 2) the nature and scope of human knowledge.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 213 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

A study of the principal ethical theories and thinkers, basic ethical problems, and related biblical teaching.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 213 or PHIL 214 or PHIL 215 or PHIL 216 or PHIL 220.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Undergraduate Level.

An intensive study of one or more wisdom traditions.
Prerequisites: PHIL 230 and PHIL 231.
Grade Mode: A.
Corequisites: PHIL 331.
Restrictions: Must be Philosophy (PHIL) or Humanities:Philosophy (HUPH); and Undergraduate Level.

A seminar designed to assist its members in practical application of insights from PHIL 330.
Grade Mode: A.
Corequisites: PHIL 330.
Restrictions: Must be Philosophy (PHIL) or Humanities:Philosophy (HUPH); and Undergraduate Level.

Directed research in topics chosen in consultation with the philosophy faculty. The student will write a substantial paper in philosophy, with some application to the Christian faith.
Prerequisites: PHIL 210, PHIL 220, PHIL 230, PHIL 231; PHIL 301 or PHIL 302 or PHIL 303.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Senior Class; and Philosophy (PHIL); Undergraduate Level.

General Philosophy