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Courses | Master of Public Health

Below are some of the courses you’ll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Take a look at the list below to get an idea of the types of available courses. Also, be sure to review the official program requirements in the Biola University catalog.

Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising.

Program Core Requirements

This is an introductory course in public health and allied health fields to provide a foundation in key epidemiologic concepts. Principles and methods used to investigate the distribution, determinants, and prevention strategies for disease in human populations. The approaches of epidemiology in estimating the burden of disease; in making inferences about cause of disease; and in evaluating primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies are presented.

This course describes the need for assessment and program planning in community and global health with specific emphasis on strategies/methods used. Strategies for conducting community assessments using community-based participatory approaches to identify factors affecting the health and well-being of population and community health are studied. Students examine health systems across and within countries, including the social, economic, cultural, and political forces and their influence on health outcomes. Organizations, programs, and practices are considered across health issues in a global setting.

This course helps students learn about the most commonly used statistical methods in clinical, public health, epidemiological, and experimental research. Students will also learn how to interpret and communicate the results of statistical analysis when studying population-level data. Topics covered in this course include basic statistical terminology, probability distributions, sampling distributions, and tests of hypothesis including nonparametric procedures, ANOVA, regression, categorical data, and documenting the results of their analyses.

This course examines theoretical constructs that underlie explanations for health-positive or health-destructive behaviors and programs to address these. Behavioral theory related to health education, promotion, planning, and assessment in various communities. Health disparities, current health practices, and relevant health-related research and current topics will be covered. Students will learn theory-based approaches to public health and health promotion. Critical analysis of existing models and future needs of the field is encouraged.

This course surveys the environmental factors that affect the health and safety of a human community. Topics include causal links between chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on health, and the genetic, physiologic, and psycho-social factors that influence environmentally compromised health outcomes. The course integrates public health strategies with concepts of sustainability and mitigation of environmental risks.

This course focuses on building character for global health leadership and understanding the value of cultural humility. Students will learn how to be a strong leader, assess organizational dynamics in the US and other countries, and create a culture of honor for international partnerships. This course helps students integrate leadership and administration in public health within the framework of current health policy.

This course will explore the place of work within God's kingdom program for history. The contours and major movements in God's program to rule the creation will provide the context for identifying the biblical understanding of the purpose and nature of work in the present age. These major movements include the pattern of work in the initially created order, patterns of work within the theocratic society of Israel, and finally, work redeemed in the truth of Jesus Christ for the present age. Special attention will be given to the place of work in the believer's spiritual formation as the source for being a leader for Christ in the workplace.

This course focuses on qualitative research and qualitative methods and their practical application in public health research to include research design and methodology, gathering of data, statistical analysis, evaluation, and research reporting as they relate to human research. It will explore selected qualitative theoretical and methodological approaches, discuss qualitative research design, research ethics, indigenous methodologies, and offer students the opportunity to practice techniques for qualitative data collection, management, and analysis.

This integrative course will allow students to put together various aspects of public health and synthesize the information they have learned. It emphasizes the data-driven and applied nature of public health practice. The coursework will be problem-based and focused on a community health planning process and prevention of a health problem. Students will conduct systematic reviews of relevant literature, perform basic data analysis, and apply other planning and evaluation techniques to develop an evidence-based population-based prevention program for a specific global or US population. This will serve as a draft proposal for the student's graduate project.

This course will allow students to complete a 250-hour (minimum) internship or research project as an end-of-program MPH graduate project based on the proposal submitted by the conclusion of their integrative experience. This graduate project will allow students to engage in a capstone experience where they are able to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to a real-world setting while continuing to gain practical experience and develop professional competencies in a research, global or community-based setting. The main purpose of this course is to provide the culminating, integrative curricular experience for students enrolled in the MPH program during their last semester prior to graduation.

This course is intended to allow students to gain practical experience and develop professional competencies in a public health agency, work site setting, or with a local community partner under the supervision of a preceptor and university graduate faculty. The practicum requires at least 150 contact hours and includes a clearly defined, goal-specific project proposal with outcome measures approved by instructor and a final report after the completion of the practical experience. The practicum is designed to provide MPH students with the opportunity to integrate the knowledge and skills developed during their academic program in a structured, supervised, professional setting in a public health, clinical, research or social service agency.


Concentrations

Global Health

This course discusses current public health issues and research topics relating to 21st-century challenges and threats. Lessons learned and best practices to strengthen public health systems and enhance public health readiness and preparedness.

This course highlights the complex interactions between global health, law and human rights, emphasizing the use of human rights in public health thinking and practice.

This course will help students develop their grant writing skills as they critique grant proposals, draft their own grant proposal, and learn about the role of program evaluation in grant writing and grant reporting.

This course focuses on practical application of public health models in the context of missions. Obtain a better understanding of cross-cultural needs, adding value to other cultures, empowering global partners, and our call as Christians to serve the world.

This course will integrate core concepts, methods and values of public health program planning and evaluation, including community, needs assessment, writing objectives, designing health promotion programs, process, and outcome evaluation.

This course addresses global communicable infectious diseases and their biology, epidemiology, environmental risk factors and control efforts. The course emphasizes the detection, spread, control, and prevention of infectious disease in tropical and developing countries. This is essential training for practitioners of global public health. Using the framework of the Millennium Development Goals, and their successors, the Sustainable Development Goals, the class will explore the prevalence, burden and prevention of HIV, TB and malaria. The course will also cover successful, completed, and ongoing infectious disease eradication campaigns, and discuss why these are necessary to promote and ensure global health equity.

This course uses public health models to obtain a better understanding of international communities. This course focuses on the impact of socioeconomic status, politics, environment, education, and gender in the etiology of illness, access to health care, the progression of the disease, prevention, and recovery. This course will be focused on the following three areas: (1) study of program planning models, (2) process of program development, and (3) methods of evaluation in public health settings.

Epidemiology

This course addresses global communicable infectious diseases and their biology, epidemiology, environmental risk factors and control efforts. The course emphasizes the detection, spread, control, and prevention of infectious disease in tropical and developing countries. This is essential training for practitioners of global public health. Using the framework of the Millennium Development Goals, and their successors, the Sustainable Development Goals, the class will explore the prevalence, burden and prevention of HIV, TB and malaria. The course will also cover successful, completed, and ongoing infectious disease eradication campaigns, and discuss why these are necessary to promote and ensure global health equity.

This course focuses on current health issues that are affecting various population and demographics in the United States and around the world. More specifically, students will examine the public health issues of the past, present, and future and observe how these issues have shaped the practice of epidemiology. Students will also use an ethical decision making model to critic epidemiological studies involving human participants.

This course explores the impact of these measures on the design, conduct, and analysis of epidemiologic studies by examining applications of molecular tools. Students learn theoretical concepts in molecular epidemiology and the use of biomarkers in epidemiologic studies. Class topics include basics of molecular epidemiology, potential uses and limitations of biomarkers, sample collection and storage, issues in epidemiologic study design and analysis, and discussion of specific research examples involving molecular markers. We also discuss the ethical issues arising from the use of advanced molecular tools in medicine and epidemiology.

This course reviews the epidemiology and available methods of prevention for a series of prominent noninfectious diseases. In the first part of the course chronic disease such as coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, hypertension and a general discussion of cancer are discussed. Students present material on a variety of other diseases of their choosing in subsequent sessions.

This course is an intensive introduction to public health emergency preparedness and response and covers a number of topics, including the role of public health in disasters; intentional mass threats; emergency operations planning and exercises; and infectious disease emergency readiness.

This course is an introduction to cancer epidemiology, highlighting current statistics (in incidence, mortality, and survival) and cancer risk factors (including host and environmental factors). Strategies for cancer prevention and control in the general population and within disproportionately affected populations will also be presented. Additionally, this course will encourage critical thinking about these concepts, covering the use of biomarkers and some controversies on cancer epidemiology research. Students will increase their knowledge of cancer epidemiology and obtain skills needed to interpret and critique research studies in the field of cancer epidemiology.

This epidemiology course focuses on the theories, strategies and processes involved in epidemiologic studies and investigations. Students will learn to think like epidemiologists, identify the appropriate type of studies to perform, gain skills in data collection methodologies and data analysis. Students will select a topic of interest and use it throughout the course to go through the steps of research, from data gathering to analysis. They will then discuss the findings of their research or primary collected data with other students and the course instructor. The data analysis project culminates in both an oral and a written presentation. Topics covered will include outbreak investigation, questionnaire development, data collection, data analysis, reporting study finding, and specific epidemiological applications.

This course covers an analysis of the government institutions and processes that affect health policy in the American context. The course has two primary goals: (1) to explore how the institutional arrangements of American government work with respect to the development of health policy; and (2) to review several health-policy case studies and identify lessons from them. Explores fundamental challenges that face all health policymakers - whatever country or its level of economic development - and the array of policy instruments that can be deployed to address them.

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