Courses | History, B.A.

Course Overview

Summary

Below are some of the courses you’ll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising. For official program requirements see catalog for details.

Major Courses

A survey of U.S. history from Reconstruction, to the gilded age and progressive era, to the world wars, the cold war, and the present age. Major Supreme Court cases will be covered as will social and ethnic issues.

Highlights in the development of World civilization with an overview of Western, Asian, African and Latin American civilizations since 1500. Examination of comparative cultural contributions made in the arts, sciences, government and religions. Includes regional geographic studies.

Required course for history majors. Introduces students to the discipline of history, to reading historical primary and secondary sources, to the steps of a quality research project, and to writing a research paper. Books on the methodology will be used, and one longer book on topics chosen by the instructor.

Special studies in history for majors utilizing the techniques of problem-solving, research and formal writing. Non-majors may undertake special study in specific geographical areas; Latin America, Europe, Asia, United States, Near East and Africa.

This course asks students to summarize and reflect on the historical content, methodology, and academic skills learned as History majors. It tests the mastery of the learning outcomes of the major. It discusses life skills, career skills, the value of history to a Christian worldview, careers for History majors, and graduate school.

The history, organization and function of the legislative, judicial and executive branches of the American government. Includes one hour per week involving students in a local government civic service or life experience activity. Satisfies the state requirement in institutions in American history.


Concentrations

Asian/African Civilization

A study of the culture of the Ancient Near East with emphasis on history, literature, religion and the modes of thought. Attention is given to cultural preparation for the biblical faith.

A historical survey of Church history from Pentecost to the present. Emphasis given to leading personalities and movements within the Church.

Survey of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean civilizations from ancient times to the present, stressing the religio-philosophical developments and their impact upon culture.

In-depth study of specific regions of Asia; one or more sections offered every year in such areas as: Modern India, Pacific Rim Nations, Modern Japan, and Modern China.

The history of China from 1800 to the present.

Regional studies in the Third World; stress on indigenous cultures. European exploration and colonization; independence movements in the post World War II era; contemporary problems including economic growth and cultural conflict.

Readings in urban history on various topics, including the European City, the Islamic City, Cities in the Developing World. Specialized research by theme, region, or epoch.

The class will focus on the design and implementation of an oral history project. Students will receive training in the methodology and techniques of oral history. Students will carry out background research, conduct fieldwork interviews, and learn the basic procedures of processing and making available oral history tapes and transcripts. These oral histories are designed to accommodate the "real world" to continue collecting the personal accounts of people who have contributed to Biola over the last 100 years.

An examination of urban life over the millennia focusing upon the meaning of life to its inhabitants in the city. Traces the development of the city beginning in Mesopotamia to today's post-industrial suburban metropolitan hubs and metacities. Explores the issues that have faced urbanized societies throughout history; how and in what ways urbanization and demographics have shaped the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of world civilizations; why Western cities are different from Asian ones; and how urban life has shaped civil society.

Russia from the origin of the nation, the Soviet period, and post-Soviet era. Analysis of Czardom, the Revolution and international relations in the modern world.

Survey of military history emphasizing the development of technology, tactics, war theory, ethical standards and worldview.

Post-biblical period to the present; social, political and cultural history of the Jew in the Middle East, Europe and the Americas; Anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, the State of Israel and Arab-Israeli tensions in the contemporary world.

A study of the major developments in the history of Christianity on the continent of Africa from the first century to the present. Emphasis will be on the role of missionaries and African agents in the emergence and growth of both mission and indigenous African churches and how Africans have engaged the gospel and adapted it to their social, religious, economic and political contexts.

African society and culture from antiquity to the present. Emphasis on regional diversity, with particular focus on the effects of Islamization, African diaspora, colonialism, Christianization, modernization and nationhood. Special emphasis on contemporary religious movements.

An in-depth study of a significant topic, period, or region in African history. These may include but are not limited to African religious history; African economic history; ancient African civilizations; trans-Atlantic slave trade; European colonialism; armed conflicts in Africa; pre-colonial Africa, gender issues in Africa, and postcolonial Africa.

History of urbanization in the Islamic world. Uniqueness of Islamic cities in world history. Multidisciplinary approach to urban history and urban studies.

Focusing on Jerusalem, students will study the diplomatic and political history of the conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis. Emphasis on Christian Zionism, political Islam, and international relations. Depending on the students in the class, position papers will be used either in simulated negotiations or panel discussions.

Focusing on Jerusalem, students will study the diplomatic and political history of the conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis. Emphasis on Christian Zionism, political Islam, and international relations. Depending on the students in the class, position papers will be used either in simulated negotiations or panel discussions.

History of Muslim, Jewish and Christian relations. Multidisciplinary approach. Questions of church and state, morality, Scripture.

The background, original development and spread of the Christian religion; emphasis on the modern era, especially contemporary growth dynamics and church structure in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Secondary Instruction

Civilizations of the Americas

An historical examination of the black's experience beginning with the African kingdoms, slave trade, slavery in the New World, emancipation during the Civil War, and the search and struggle for equality, to the present.

Settlement and growth of the Anglo-American civilization; the American Revolution; growth of political, economic, social and religious institutions to 1800.

Nationalism and the growth of sectionalism reform movements; Manifest Destiny; disruption of American democracy, Civil War and political reconstruction to 1877.

Social impact of westward expansion, immigration, industrialization, urbanization and cultural pluralism combined with major intellectual ideas instrumental in the shaping of American society.

Major indigenous civilizations; conquest by Spain and Portugal; colonial institutions and culture; wars of independence, political, economic and social developments to the present, including the role of the United States in the region.

Historical development of the office of the presidency; formal and informal powers of the President in executive, legislative, judicial, military, diplomatic and political areas.

A historical survey of Church history from Pentecost to the present. Emphasis given to leading personalities and movements within the Church.

Sections offered each year on such topics as: the American South, the American West, Women in America, the Asian Americans.

Growth and development of the American economy from the Colonial period to contemporary times. Emphasis on such dynamic factors as political, social, legal, technological and international developments affecting changes in agriculture, transportation, communication, commerce, industry and finance.

Survey of the history of Mexico from pre-Colombian times to the present, emphasizing social, cultural, religious and political developments, as well as relations between Mexico and the United States.

Study of ethno-cultural groups—highland Mayas, Afro-Cubans, Japanese, Brazilians, etc.—and social groups such as university students, urban slum dwellers (favelados), etc; economic activities, social practices, religion and arts. Emphasis on both historical factors and contemporary developments.

Revolutionary movements and regimes in 20th century Latin America: Mexican Revolution of 1910, Castro's Cuba, Sandinismo (Nicaragua), Sendero (Peru), Zapatismo (Mexico). Analysis of international, regional and local factors, as well as of revolutionary culture and search for social justice.

Post-Civil War economic growth, immigration, trans-Mississippi settlement, industrialization, urbanization; America's rise to world power, Progressive Era and World War I.

Shaping of American social, economic, political, religious and intellectual life and foreign policy in the era of the twenties, New Deal, World War II, Cold War; emphasis on America's new role in a world of global interdependence.

Exploration, colonization and geography; indigenous people; the Mexican period; statehood; the social, economic and political developments in the 20th century. Examination of contemporary California diversity and regional issues.

Readings in urban history on various topics, including the European City, the Islamic City, Cities in the Developing World. Specialized research by theme, region, or epoch.

A religious history of the United States from the Colonial to the contemporary period, emphasizing the Church's effect on and its response to Puritanism, the westward movement, social and intellectual ferment, industrialization, immigration, urbanization and war.

An examination of the principles of the American Constitutional system looking primarily at U.S. Supreme Court decisions and the historical development of Constitutional Law. Attention also given to the judicial branch and its role in American government and politics, particularly its continuing interpretation of the U.S. Constitution as the framework for American democracy.

Survey the history of the American West, beginning with Lewis and Clark and continuing to the present. Will briefly cover the West prior to the arrival of the Americans, but focuses primarily on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Will examine some of the major themes in Western history, including early explorers, the expansion of the American frontier, the experiences of Native American tribes, the growth of ranching, railroads and mines, conflicts over urbanization and environmentalism, and the role of the federal government in the economic development of the west in the 20th Century.

The class will focus on the design and implementation of an oral history project. Students will receive training in the methodology and techniques of oral history. Students will carry out background research, conduct fieldwork interviews, and learn the basic procedures of processing and making available oral history tapes and transcripts. These oral histories are designed to accommodate the "real world" to continue collecting the personal accounts of people who have contributed to Biola over the last 100 years.

An examination of urban life over the millennia focusing upon the meaning of life to its inhabitants in the city. Traces the development of the city beginning in Mesopotamia to today's post-industrial suburban metropolitan hubs and metacities. Explores the issues that have faced urbanized societies throughout history; how and in what ways urbanization and demographics have shaped the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of world civilizations; why Western cities are different from Asian ones; and how urban life has shaped civil society.

Survey of military history emphasizing the development of technology, tactics, war theory, ethical standards and worldview.

The background, original development and spread of the Christian religion; emphasis on the modern era, especially contemporary growth dynamics and church structure in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

European Civilization

Survey of British history from the Anglo-Saxon period to contemporary times; emphasis on social, intellectual, religious and political developments.

Period and thematic studies in British history to include: Tudor-Stuart England, Victorian England, Empire and Commonwealth, Religious History of England, British Politics and the English Middle Class.

Medieval Europe from the fall of Rome through the 14th century; emphasis on the church, theological development, political institutions, society, literature and economics of the period.

Thematic and period studies in 16th through 20th century Europe including: Age of Revolutions, Age of Ideologies, Enlightenment, Industrialization, Holocaust, and Global Interdependence.

A historical survey of Church history from Pentecost to the present. Emphasis given to leading personalities and movements within the Church.

History of Ancient Greece from the Minoan-Mycenaean cultures to the Hellenistic period; emphasis on the literature, religion, art and modes of thought of the period.

Roman history from its beginning to the fall of the Empire; Rome's part in the preparation of the Mediterranean world for the spread of Christianity; Rome's contributions to Western civilization.

The class will focus on the design and implementation of an oral history project. Students will receive training in the methodology and techniques of oral history. Students will carry out background research, conduct fieldwork interviews, and learn the basic procedures of processing and making available oral history tapes and transcripts. These oral histories are designed to accommodate the "real world" to continue collecting the personal accounts of people who have contributed to Biola over the last 100 years.

An examination of urban life over the millennia focusing upon the meaning of life to its inhabitants in the city. Traces the development of the city beginning in Mesopotamia to today's post-industrial suburban metropolitan hubs and metacities. Explores the issues that have faced urbanized societies throughout history; how and in what ways urbanization and demographics have shaped the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of world civilizations; why Western cities are different from Asian ones; and how urban life has shaped civil society.

Russia from the origin of the nation, the Soviet period, and post-Soviet era. Analysis of Czardom, the Revolution and international relations in the modern world.

Europe from the late 14th to early 17th century. Stress on changes inaugurated by the Renaissance and Reformation; rise of nation-states and foundations of modern European society.

The history of Europe, including Russia, from 1550 to 1900. Wars of Religion, Scientific Revolution, Absolutism and political theory; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; the nineteenth century.

Europe in the era of World War I, the rise of Communism, Fascism and Hitler's Nazi Party; World War II and the post-war period; the Cold War and the collapse of the communist system.

Survey of military history emphasizing the development of technology, tactics, war theory, ethical standards and worldview.

History of German-speaking lands and Germany from 1500 to present. Covers the Protestant Reformations, the Enlightenment, the rise of Prussia, unification, the two world wars, Wiemar Republic, Nazism, the Holocaust, divided Germany, and reunification. Art, classical music, and philosophy will also be explored.

Focusing on Jerusalem, students will study the diplomatic and political history of the conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis. Emphasis on Christian Zionism, political Islam, and international relations. Depending on the students in the class, position papers will be used either in simulated negotiations or panel discussions.

The background, original development and spread of the Christian religion; emphasis on the modern era, especially contemporary growth dynamics and church structure in Africa, Asia and Latin America.