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Fall Faculty Conference 2022

Cost and Admission

This event is free to attend.


Fall Faculty Conference 2022

Here: The Story of Why

Returning to the “why” can revive a sense of meaningfulness and purpose in our professional lives. Our 2022 Fall Faculty Conference will provide faculty with a space to reflect individually and collectively on the following three questions: 

1) What brought you here?

2) What keeps you here?

3) Why is here important? 

This year’s conference components will include several approaches to exploring the value of “here” through the power of story in large and small group settings. From these interactions, faculty are invited to consider how they might incorporate a deeper understanding and implementation of “here” in their teaching, research, and service in the coming academic year.

Fall Faculty Conference is co-directed by Shelly Cunningham, Associate Provost for Faculty Advancement and Arianna Molloy, Associate Professor of Communication Studies & Pedagogy Development Consultant.


Questions?

Contact Karina Serrano at:
562-944-0351 x3844
karina.e.serrano@biola.edu


Schedule

The conference will take place for two full days on Tuesday, August 23 and Wednesday, August 24 in the Tent at Fluor Fountain. These days have been structured to honor your time and energy. With that in mind, there will be large group sessions combined with smaller professional development workshops (of your choosing). Workshop descriptions can be found in the Workshops tab.

 

Tuesday, August 23, 2022

Time Program
8:30 a.m.

Registration (coffee and water provided)

9–10 a.m.
10–10:45 a.m.

Provost's story: Dr. Matt Hall
Interviewed by Teri Clemons, SLP.D.

10:45–11:15 a.m.

Break (snacks and beverages provided)

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.
12:15–1:15 p.m.

Lunch (provided in the Tent)

1:30–2:30 p.m.

Workshop session 1

2:45–3:45 p.m.

Workshop session 2

4–5 p.m.

(OPTIONAL) Campus Safety in the Classroom – The realities, behind-the-scene preparations and general tips for faculty: Chief John Ojeisekhoba Sr

 

Wednesday, August 24, 2022

Time Program
8:30 a.m.

Coffee and water provided

9–10:15 a.m.
9:45–10:15 a.m.

Table Talks

10:15-10:45 a.m.

Break (snacks and beverages provided)

10:45–11:45 a.m.

President's story: Dr. Barry Corey
Interviewed by John Poston, Ph.D.

11:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Worship/Reflective Commitment to new Academic Year

12:15–1:15 p.m.

Lunch (provided in the Tent)

1:30–2:30 p.m.

Workshop session 3

2:45–4 p.m.

Faculty and Staff Kickoff

Workshops

The conference includes a total of three opportunities to attend innovative professional development workshops designed specifically to fit your expressed needs. Understanding time constraints that faculty often experience at the beginning of the semester, we suggest that you consider taking part in at least two. Please use the form below to register for workshops by August 16.

Register for Workshops

 

Tuesday, August 23, 2022

Workshop Session #1

1:30–2:30 p.m.

Navigating Multiple Roles - Success Strategies for Female Faculty
Teri Clemons, SLP.D. | Christina Lee Kim, Ph.D.| Yvana Uranga-Hernandez, Ph.D.

As female faculty we often navigate multiple roles and how we go about this can shape our success. In this workshop, you will hear from 3 female faculty who have a combined 50 years of experience here at Biola university. You will learn strategies for setting boundaries between work life, home life, and ministry; strategies for effective time management and productivity as it pertains to scholarship; perspectives on allocating time toward university service opportunities; and campus resources that are available for female faculty. While this workshop focuses on the experiences of female faculty, it is open to both women and men.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45–3:45 p.m.

Promotion and Tenure
Tamara Anderson, Ph.D. | Jason McMartin, Ph.D.

In this ever-changing academic landscape, it’s hard to know what’s expected at key moments of your professional development such as promotion and tenure. The purpose of this workshop is to provide updated information regarding the promotion and tenure process at Biola. Feel free to bring your questions so that you feel supported to confidently navigate the promo and tenure process in this upcoming year.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45–3:45 p.m.

Living Leadership: Engaging your classroom dynamics
Anna Sinclair, M.O.L.

On the first day of class, the students come in and sit down and you start teaching, but there is so much more going on under the surface. This workshop experience will be directed toward honing your leadership in the classroom in a way that engages students, not only with your course content, but with group dynamics, psychological safety, and with you as their educator. Together, we will learn how to incorporate organizational leadership essentials and apply some key leadership learning styles to engage the cultural and social dynamics in the classroom. Through presentation and various worship activities, participants will begin to realize and strengthen their personal organizational leadership with the goal to cultivate a positive, authentic, and thriving classroom.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45–3:45 p.m.

Self-Care and Resilience
Melanie Taylor, Psy.D. | Michele Willingham, Psy.D.

This workshop will include an overview of the habits and disciplines that can contribute to resiliency. We will present a brief theoretical overview of resiliency and translate theory into ideas for everyday practices that can help reduce fatigue during the academic year. We will provide time for Q&A and discussion.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and Wed, Aug 24, 1:30–2:30 p.m.

Longing for Connection: Promoting Student Well-being and Academic Success through Belonging

Lisa Igram, M.Div. | Katie Tuttle, Ph.D.

Our students’ sense of belonging (socially, academically, and spiritually) lies at the intersection of their holistic well-being and academic success. Nation-wide research and our own observations tell us that students’ longing for connection has deepened following these past few years of social disconnect, sparked both by the pandemic and political/social turmoil. At the same time, remote learning has limited the social and relational practice our students would normally engage during these formative years. In this session, we will share research around college students' sense of belonging in this current season and discuss together how these dynamics impact classroom learning. We will then consider best practices to both support students' relationship-building skills and foster in the classroom that sense of belonging they so desire.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45–3:45 p.m.

Simple Tech - Why and what to use in teaching

Kit Ng, Ph.D.

Education technology is a growing field, and many of us adopted various technologies when we pivoted to online teaching. Some were good; some were not. In this workshop, we will take a step back and evaluate the role of technology in the classroom together. Can we use technology not as an end but as a means to better teaching? We will also provide some resources to equip you for your teaching needs.

In Defense of Biola Core Curriculum

Cherry McCabe, J.D. | Kevin Pittle, Ph.D. | Charlie Trimm, Ph.D.

With heightened concern about cost and time to graduation, today’s students (and their parents) may not realize the difference between general education at a community college and the distinctive, Christ-centered Biola Core. This workshop will include a brief update on what’s happening in our Core Curriculum, facilitate conversation about how your classes are different from standard community college classes, and offer ideas to strengthen unified messaging about the value of the Biola Core.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45–3:45 p.m.

Easy ways to help your students translate their classroom learning in a job interview

Tiffany Lee, M.A. | Raquel McLeod, Career Specialist | KiYong Kim, M.A.

National trends in higher education have resulted in a growing emphasis on student career outcomes. A Biola degree gives students valuable skillsets, but are students able to translate their coursework to an employer? In this workshop, we’ll present examples of how some of our faculty members are integrating interview preparation into their courses and give resources to easily create assignments that help students communicate the alignment of their learning with work.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45-3:45 p.m.

Active Shooter Preparedness

Chief Ojeisekhoba & Campus Safety Team

Mass shootings and the phenomena commonly referred to as "active shooting" have plagued our nation for far too long. Acknowledging and addressing this potential threat and implementing proactive measures before an incident are crucial steps to mitigating risks to students, faculty, and staff. For this workshop, certified trainers from the Department of Campus Safety will provide a summary of the benefits of hands-on training inside a classroom. Trainers will methodically walk participating faculty members through security apparatus and crucial actions to take (adaptable to any campus classroom). Trainers will provide participants with resources and tools that will be utilized during the hands-on scenario. The hands-on scenario will be videotaped for debriefing purposes and will be played back after the final scenario/role-playing. Non-projectile equipment capable of simulated gunshots will be applied during the final scenario/role-playing. No live firearm or any other weapon will be permitted inside the building and classroom including trainers. Thorough safety checks will be conducted before each participant enters the classroom. Earplugs will be provided to participants. Participants should wear comfortable shoes.

This workshop will repeat for all 3 workshop session slots.

Workshop Session #2

2:45–3:45 p.m.

Ministering to Spanish Speakers in Our Community

Dominick S. Hernández, Ph.D.

Given the substantial and ever-growing Spanish-speaking community in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, a large percentage of the congregants of Evangelical churches are Spanish speaking. As these churches grow in size and influence in our communities, what are some practical steps that we can take to minister alongside our Spanish-speaking brothers and sisters? Additionally, how might we be able to work toward facilitating Spanish-language academic instruction within the institutional context so that Spanish and English speakers might be able to fellowship with and learn from one another? During this interactive workshop, we will discuss transcending the current challenges to partnering with Spanish-speakers in our communities with the goal of synergistically multiplying our Christian witness by working together.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 2:45–3:45 p.m. and Wed, Aug 24, 1:30–2:30 p.m.

Navigating Multiple Roles - Success Strategies for Female Faculty

Teri Clemons, SLP.D. | Christina Lee Kim, Ph.D.| Yvana Uranga-Hernandez, Ph.D.

As female faculty we often navigate multiple roles and how we go about this can shape our success. In this workshop, you will hear from 3 female faculty who have a combined 50 years of experience here at Biola university. You will learn strategies for setting boundaries between work life, home life, and ministry; strategies for effective time management and productivity as it pertains to scholarship; perspectives on allocating time toward university service opportunities; and campus resources that are available for female faculty. While this workshop focuses on the experiences of female faculty, it is open to both women and men.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45–3:45 p.m.

Promotion and Tenure

Tamara Anderson, Ph.D. | Jason McMartin, Ph.D.

In this ever-changing academic landscape, it’s hard to know what’s expected at key moments of your professional development such as promotion and tenure. The purpose of this workshop is to provide updated information regarding the promotion and tenure process at Biola. Feel free to bring your questions so that you feel supported to confidently navigate the promo and tenure process in this upcoming year.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45-3:45 p.m.

Living Leadership: Engaging your classroom dynamics

Anna Sinclair, M.O.L.

On the first day of class, the students come in and sit down and you start teaching, but there is so much more going on under the surface. This workshop experience will be directed toward honing your leadership in the classroom in a way that engages students, not only with your course content, but with group dynamics, psychological safety, and with you as their educator. Together, we will learn how to incorporate organizational leadership essentials and apply some key leadership learning styles to engage the cultural and social dynamics in the classroom. Through presentation and various worship activities, participants will begin to realize and strengthen their personal organizational leadership with the goal to cultivate a positive, authentic, and thriving classroom.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45-3:45 p.m.

Missing Rest

Joanne Jung, Ph.D.

Feeling weary of feeling weary? Many of us are experiencing longer stretches of deep exhaustion. Based on Sandra Dalton-Smith's book, Sacred Rest, this workshop will identify several practices that can facilitate and lead us into spaces of active rest. A “three-course meal” toward greater rest awaits you as we incorporate morsels unique to academia.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 2:45–3:45 p.m. and Wed, Aug 24, 1:30–2:30 p.m.

Longing for Connection: Promoting Student Well-being and Academic Success through Belonging

Lisa Igram, M.Div. | Katie Tuttle, Ph.D.

Our students’ sense of belonging (socially, academically, and spiritually) lies at the intersection of their holistic well-being and academic success. Nation-wide research and our own observations tell us that students’ longing for connection has deepened following these past few years of social disconnect, sparked both by the pandemic and political/social turmoil. At the same time, remote learning has limited the social and relational practice our students would normally engage during these formative years. In this session, we will share research around college students' sense of belonging in this current season and discuss together how these dynamics impact classroom learning. We will then consider best practices to both support students' relationship-building skills and foster in the classroom that sense of belonging they so desire.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45–3:45 p.m.

Students + Reading. Relationship Status: It's Complicated

Chuck Koontz, M.L.I.S. | Jeremy Labosier, M.L.I.S.

Reading on screens is now common in the classroom, for homework and elsewhere. Does this mode of reading achieve the same outcomes as reading from the printed page? A significant body of research has now been published on this topic, and it’s clear that there are tradeoffs. We will review the research that is applicable to our setting at Biola, discuss practical options including affordability for students, and share how the Library can be a partner in meeting these needs.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 2:45–3:45 p.m. and Wed, Aug 24, 1:30–2:30 p.m.

In Defense of Biola Core Curriculum

Cherry McCabe, J.D. | Kevin Pittle, Ph.D. | Charlie Trimm, Ph.D.

With heightened concern about cost and time to graduation, today’s students (and their parents) may not realize the difference between general education at a community college and the distinctive, Christ-centered Biola Core. This workshop will include a brief update on what’s happening in our Core Curriculum, facilitate conversation about how your classes are different from standard community college classes, and offer ideas to strengthen unified messaging about the value of the Biola Core.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45–3:45 p.m.

Easy ways to help your students translate their classroom learning in a job interview
Tiffany Lee, M.A. | Raquel McLeod, Career Specialist | KiYong Kim, M.A.

National trends in higher education have resulted in a growing emphasis on student career outcomes. A Biola degree gives students valuable skillsets, but are students able to translate their coursework to an employer? In this workshop, we’ll present examples of how some of our faculty members are integrating interview preparation into their courses and give resources to easily create assignments that help students communicate the alignment of their learning with work.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and 2:45–3:45 p.m.

Active Shooter Preparedness
Chief Ojeisekhoba & Campus Safety Team

Mass shootings and the phenomena commonly referred to as "active shooting" have plagued our nation for far too long. Acknowledging and addressing this potential threat and implementing proactive measures before an incident are crucial steps to mitigating risks to students, faculty, and staff. For this workshop, certified trainers from the Department of Campus Safety will provide a summary of the benefits of hands-on training inside a classroom. Trainers will methodically walk participating faculty members through security apparatus and crucial actions to take (adaptable to any campus classroom). Trainers will provide participants with resources and tools that will be utilized during the hands-on scenario. The hands-on scenario will be videotaped for debriefing purposes and will be played back after the final scenario/role-playing. Non-projectile equipment capable of simulated gunshots will be applied during the final scenario/role-playing. No live firearm or any other weapon will be permitted inside the building and classroom including trainers. Thorough safety checks will be conducted before each participant enters the classroom. Earplugs will be provided to participants. Participants should wear comfortable shoes.

This workshop will repeat for all 3 workshop session slots.

Wednesday, August 24, 2022

Workshop Session #3

1:30–2:30 p.m.

How to Have Conversations with LGBTQ Students

Matt Jenson, Ph.D. | Chris Barragan, M.A.

The last two decades have witnessed a sea change in beliefs and approaches to sexuality and gender in America. The ground underneath us has changed, and many of us feel ill-equipped to help our students think charitably and critically about these things. This is all the more difficult when we are not talking about, but to, a student who identifies as LGBTQ. In this workshop, we’ll give you a handful of tips for navigating conversations with LGBTQ students with grace and truth. We’ll also tell some stories, point you to a few resources, and make ample time to talk together and glean wisdom from one another.

Ministering to Spanish Speakers in Our Community

Dominick S. Hernández, Ph.D.

Given the substantial and ever-growing Spanish-speaking community in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, a large percentage of the congregants of Evangelical churches are Spanish speaking. As these churches grow in size and influence in our communities, what are some practical steps that we can take to minister alongside our Spanish-speaking brothers and sisters? Additionally, how might we be able to work toward facilitating Spanish-language academic instruction within the institutional context so that Spanish and English speakers might be able to fellowship with and learn from one another? During this interactive workshop, we will discuss transcending the current challenges to partnering with Spanish-speakers in our communities with the goal of synergistically multiplying our Christian witness by working together.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 2:45–3:45 p.m. and Wed, Aug 24, 1:30–2:30 p.m.

The Inclusive Instructor: Faculty Narratives on Creating a Engaging Learning Environment

Dorothy Alston Calley, M.A. | Glen Kinoshita, Ph.D.| Denise Reid, Ph.D. | Yvana Uranga-Hernandez, Ph.D.

In light of our increasingly diverse student population (i.e. first generation, multiracial students, students with differing abilities, etc.), what might be some effective ways to help all students flourish as they learn? Despite the many challenges, the diversity our students bring into our classrooms can be one of the greatest blessings to the education process. Facilitators for this session will share personal reflections on how they engage the demographics and cultures of their classes as an enriching learning experience for all.

Mentorship is Not Enough: How to Be a Good Sponsor

Liz Hall, Ph.D. | Laureen Mgrdichian, MBA | Jamie Smith, Ed.D.

Philippians 2:4 tells us to “look not only to your own interests, but also to the interests of others.” Sponsoring is one practical way we can do this for other faculty in our academic context. In this workshop we differentiate mentorship from sponsorship, show its importance to career development, and provide practical guidance for sponsoring others. A particular focus is on sponsorship as a way to address diversity, equity, and inclusion issues.

Reaching the Public with Your Research without Losing Your Integrity

Carmen Imes, Ph.D. | Rachel Bodell, DBA

This session is a practical workshop that starts with clarification on "why" we share our research more widely and then offers practical steps for "how" to do it well–without the drift towards self-interest or loss of integrity. We’ll talk about how to make your ideas accessible to key audiences and easier to find. Topics will include how to increase your reach using social media platforms such as LinkedIn and Facebook, e-commerce and informational websites such as Amazon and Blogger, and different mediums such as vlogging on YouTube and podcasting from Buzzsprout to Apple Podcasts. We’ll also share tips on how to optimize search engines so that those who can benefit from your knowledge will be able to find it on the first page of a Google search.

Self-Care and Resilience

Melanie Taylor, Psy.D. | Michele Willingham, Psy.D.

This workshop will include an overview of the habits and disciplines that can contribute to resiliency. We will present a brief theoretical overview of resiliency and translate theory into ideas for everyday practices that can help reduce fatigue during the academic year. We will provide time for Q&A and discussion.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 1:30–2:30 p.m. and Wed, Aug 24, 1:30–2:30 p.m.

Missing Rest

Joanne Jung, Ph.D.

Feeling weary of feeling weary? Many of us are experiencing longer stretches of deep exhaustion. Based on Sandra Dalton-Smith's book, Sacred Rest, this workshop will identify several practices that can facilitate and lead us into spaces of active rest. A “three-course meal” toward greater rest awaits you as we incorporate morsels unique to academia.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 2:45–3:45 p.m. and Wed, Aug 24, 1:30–2:30 p.m.

Students + Reading. Relationship Status: It's Complicated

Chuck Koontz, M.L.I.S. | Jeremy Labosier, M.L.I.S.

Reading on screens is now common in the classroom, for homework and elsewhere. Does this mode of reading achieve the same outcomes as reading from the printed page? A significant body of research has now been published on this topic, and it’s clear that there are tradeoffs. We will review the research that is applicable to our setting at Biola, discuss practical options including affordability for students, and share how the Library can be a partner in meeting these needs.

This workshop will be offered twice: Tue, Aug 23, 2:45–3:45 p.m. and Wed, Aug 24, 1:30–2:30 p.m.

Metacognitive musings: Using reflection for learning, accountability, and formative assessment

Sarah Flores, D.N.P. | Electra Allen, M.S.N.

Multiple verses tell us that meditation on God’s word leads to wisdom. It’s no surprise then that current scholarly literature supports reflection as a way to develop critical thinking. How do we incorporate metacognition practices into our classrooms to promote self-awareness, develop judgment, and improve performance on assessments? This session will present a few tactics employed including exam wrappers and exit tickets, with time for sharing best practices across our disciplines.

Building Academic Honesty and Trust in the Age of Digital Cheating

Elmar Hashimov, Ph.D.

In our increasingly robust digital world, it is increasingly easy for students to fall into traps leading to plagiarism and new, digitally sophisticated forms of cheating. According to a large-scale national study (Ridolfo et al., 2022), no type of institution is immune to the disturbing trends of "paper mill cheating" and "contract cheating"—that is, academic work for hire. Even at faith-based universities like Biola, students often resort to these forms of academic dishonesty out of stress and desperation. How can we encourage our students to turn in honest work without becoming "plagiarism police" armed with tools like Turnitin? How can we battle paper-mill and contract cheating, which are nearly impossible to catch? This workshop takes a low-tech approach to a high-tech problem, focusing on building academic honesty and mutual trust through effective classroom practices and teaching strategies.

Active Shooter Preparedness

Chief Ojeisekhoba & Campus Safety Team

Mass shootings and the phenomena commonly referred to as "active shooting" have plagued our nation for far too long. Acknowledging and addressing this potential threat and implementing proactive measures before an incident are crucial steps to mitigating risks to students, faculty, and staff. For this workshop, certified trainers from the Department of Campus Safety will provide a summary of the benefits of hands-on training inside a classroom. Trainers will methodically walk participating faculty members through security apparatus and crucial actions to take (adaptable to any campus classroom). Trainers will provide participants with resources and tools that will be utilized during the hands-on scenario. The hands-on scenario will be videotaped for debriefing purposes and will be played back after the final scenario/role-playing. Non-projectile equipment capable of simulated gunshots will be applied during the final scenario/role-playing. No live firearm or any other weapon will be permitted inside the building and classroom including trainers. Thorough safety checks will be conducted before each participant enters the classroom. Earplugs will be provided to participants. Participants should wear comfortable shoes.

This workshop will repeat for all 3 workshop session slots.

About

Fall Faculty Conference is an annual event for all faculty to come together as one visible corporate body motivated by a sense of collective mission, purpose, and values. The goal of the Faculty Conference is to help create focused attention to topics of need and/or enrichment identified in annual faculty surveys and focus groups. Conference programming is designed to address what faculty see as high priorities within our Biola community and for their professional growth and development (in teaching, research and service). Recognizing that faculty are transitioning from various summer projects, classes and life experiences, this program offers space to come back together as a community and helps set the tone for the upcoming academic year.

The conference is motivated by the felt need to strengthen our sense of community. The cornerstone of a healthy community is a high degree of trust, rooted in the following three values:

  1. Cohesion: As a Christian, academic community, what common bonds do we share?
  2. Supportiveness: How can we express value to each other? How can we ensure people know they are wanted and appreciated?
  3. Openness: How can we promote continued learning and an open exchange of ideas in a kind and honest manner?

Fall Faculty Conference is co-directed by Shelly Cunningham, Associate Provost for Faculty Advancement and Arianna Molloy, Associate Professor of Communication Studies & Pedagogy Development Consultant.