Courses | Communication Sciences and Disorders, B.S.

Course Overview

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.

Summary

Below are some of the courses you’ll have an opportunity to take as a student in this program. Note: This list is intended to give you a quick glimpse into the program’s academic offerings, and should not be used as a guide for course selection or academic advising. For official program requirements see catalog for details.

General Education

A survey of biological principles including: the cell, zoology, ecology, human anatomy, genetics, and origin of life theories.

Basic principles and practice in the fundamental skills of signs and fingerspelling from the ASL perspective for communication with the deaf.

Basic principles and practice in the fundamental skills of signs and fingerspelling from the ASL perspective for communication with the deaf.

Designed for those who possess the basic skills of manual communication. Further instruction in the development of ASL vocabulary, fingerspelling, fluency, receptive and expressive skills.

Nature of statistical methods, description of sample data, fundamental concepts of probability, probability distributions, sampling, estimation, correlation and regression, application of same.

Prepares the student for biostatistical application essential to practice in evidence-based professions. Content includes: descriptive statistics; probability theory and rules; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling distributions; confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; experimental design; ANOVA; linear and multiple regression; contingency table analysis; non-parametrics; survival analysis; discussion of the use of statistics in journal articles.

A survey of the basic principles of physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology and astronomy. Designed for the non-science major.

A survey of psychology as an empirical/behavioral science with a consideration of underlying philosophical bases in light of a Christian worldview. Topics to be surveyed include development, cognition, learning, motivation, physiology, socialization, personality and psychopathology.

Sociological concepts with emphasis on group life, culture, socialization, social institutions, social processes and change. Theoretical as well as practical application of interaction and its effect on individuals in groups.

Major Courses

Survey of various types of human disabilities with an emphasis on communication disorders. Explores the roles of Speech-Language Pathologists, Audiologists, Physical Therapists and Occupational Therapists in working with people with disabilities.

An in-depth analysis of the nervous system as it pertains to communication and communication disorders. In addition, various neurological disorders will be surveyed that can affect communication. These include, but are not limited to, ALS, Parkinson's disease, stroke, brain tumor, etc.

The study of phonetic transcription and phonological theory and the application of these concepts to patients with disordered speech.

Anatomy and physiology of the speech and hearing mechanisms. The normal processes of respiration, phonation, articulation, resonance and hearing are covered.

Introduction to acoustics of sound and the physiology and acoustics of speech production and perceptions. Topics include voice, resonance, and individual speech segments as well as instrumentation for analyzing the acoustic and perceptual characteristics of speech and hearing.

Review of the theories concerning etiology of fluency disorders. Survey assessment and treatment approaches for stuttering and cluttering.

Normal development of speech and language in children in terms of syntax, semantics, phonology and pragmatics. Motor and cognitive development surveyed. Including the study of delayed language development and childhood language disorders with theories concerning etiology, classification, evaluation and therapy for children birth to 5 years old.

Normal development of speech and language in children in terms of syntax, semantics, phonology and pragmatics. Motor and cognitive development surveyed. Including the study of delayed language development and childhood language disorders with theories concerning etiology, classification, evaluation and therapy for children 5 years old to adolescents.

Involves the assessment and intervention of students from multicultural backgrounds with speech and/or language difficulties. Attention paid to developing "cultural sensitivity" and an awareness of the cultural and bilingual influences on assessment and intervention decisions. The course is intended to prepare the student for effective and innovative work with clients from diverse populations.

Covers theory, psychology, assessment and treatment of cognitive and communication disorders resulting from stroke, traumatic brain injury, and other neurological problems. Diagnoses covered include aphasia, right hemisphere syndrome, head injury, apraxia, dysarthia and dementia.

Review of management procedures used by professionals for the rehabilitation/habitation of persons with hearing impairments. Includes speech reading, auditory training, hearing aids and other communication systems and assistive listening devices.

Anatomy and physiology of the ear; hearing problems, testing and rehabilitation. Practical experience in pure tone threshold testing.

Supervised experience working with persons with communication disorders in the Biola Speech Clinic and offsite locations.

The anatomy and physiology of normal swallowing and the anatomic and physiologic disturbances affecting deglutition, emphasizing radiographic and bedside diagnostic and treatment procedures.

Overview of the etiologies, diagnosis and remediation of articulation and phonological problems.

Survey of procedures ranging from interviewing to formal and informal tests involved in the evaluation and assessment of speech, language, voice, cognitive and swallowing problems in children and adults.

Introduction to general therapeutic approaches and specific techniques of habilitation and rehabilitation of speech, language, voice, cognitive and swallowing problems in child and adult populations.

Topics to be covered include: etiologies, types of voice disorders including neurogenic, functional, and organic voice disorders, and review of assessment and treatment methods. Various craniofacial disorders that affect voice will also be surveyed, such as cleft palate.

Survey of research terminology and methods as well as an emphasis on critiquing research. Course includes a student capstone research project.